SEO Spider Tabs

User Guide

Internal

The Internal tab combines all data extracted from most other tabs, except the external, hreflang and structured data tabs. This means all data can be viewed comprehensively, and exported together for further analysis.

URLs classed as ‘Internal’ are on the same subdomain as the start page of the crawl. URLs can be made to be internal, by using the ‘crawl all subdomains‘ configuration, list mode, or the CDNs feature.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL address.
  • Content – The content type of the URL.
  • Status Code – The HTTP response code.
  • Status – The HTTP header response.
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is Indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if it’s canonicalised to another URL.
  • Title 1 – The (first) page title discovered on the page.
  • Title 1 Length – The character length of the page title.
  • Title 1 Pixel Width – The pixel width of the page title as described in our pixel width post.
  • Meta Description 1 – The (first) meta description on the page.
  • Meta Description Length 1 – The character length of the meta description.
  • Meta Description Pixel Width – The pixel width of the meta description.
  • Meta Keyword 1 – The meta keywords.
  • Meta Keywords Length – The character length of the meta keywords.
  • h1 – 1 – The first h1 (heading) on the page.
  • h1 – Len-1 – The character length of the h1.
  • h2 – 1 – The first h2 (heading) on the page.
  • h2 – Len-1 – The character length of the h2.
  • Meta Robots 1 – Meta robots directives found on the URL.
  • X-Robots-Tag 1 – X-Robots-tag HTTP header directives for the URL.
  • Meta Refresh 1 – Meta refresh data.
  • Canonical Link Element – The canonical link element data.
  • rel=“next” 1 – The SEO Spider collects these HTML link elements designed to indicate the relationship between URLs in a paginated series.
  • rel=“prev” 1 – The SEO Spider collects these HTML link elements designed to indicate the relationship between URLs in a paginated series.
  • HTTP rel=“next” 1 – The SEO Spider collects these HTTP link elements designed to indicate the relationship between URLs in a paginated series.
  • HTTP rel=“prev” 1 – The SEO Spider collects these HTTP link elements designed to indicate the relationship between URLs in a paginated series.
  • Size – The size of the resource, taken from the Content-Length HTTP header. If this field is not provided, the size is reported as zero. For HTML pages this is updated to the size of the (uncompressed) HTML. Upon export, size is in bytes, so please divide by 1,024 to convert to kilobytes.
  • Transferred – The number of bytes that were actually transferred to load the resource, which might be less than the ‘size’ if compressed.
  • Word Count – This is all ‘words’ inside the body tag, excluding HTML markup. The count is based upon the content area that can be adjusted under ‘Config > Content > Area’. By default, the nav and footer elements are excluded. You can include or exclude HTML elements, classes and IDs to calculate a refined word count. Our figures may not be exactly what performing this calculation manually would find, as the parser performs certain fix-ups on invalid HTML. Your rendering settings also affect what HTML is considered. Our definition of a word is taking the text and splitting it by spaces. No consideration is given to visibility of content (such as text inside a div set to hidden).
  • Text Ratio – Number of non-HTML characters found in the HTML body tag on a page (the text), divided by the total number of characters the HTML page is made up of, and displayed as a percentage.
  • Crawl Depth – Depth of the page from the start page (number of ‘clicks’ away from the start page). Please note, redirects are counted as a level currently in our page depth calculations.
  • Folder Depth – Depth of the URL based upon the number of subfolders (/sub-folder/) in the URL path. This is not an SEO metric to optimise, but can be useful for segmentation, and advanced table search.
  • Link Score – A metric between 0-100, which calculates the relative value of a page based upon its internal links similar to Google’s own PageRank. For this column to populate, ‘crawl analysis‘ is required.
  • Inlinks – Number of internal hyperlinks to the URL. ‘Internal inlinks’ are links in anchor elements pointing to a given URL from the same subdomain that is being crawled.
  • Unique Inlinks – Number of ‘unique’ internal inlinks to the URL. ‘Internal inlinks’ are links in anchor elements pointing to a given URL from the same subdomain that is being crawled. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ 3 times, this would be counted as 3 inlinks and 1 unique inlink to ‘page B’.
  • Unique JS Inlinks – Number of ‘unique’ internal inlinks to the URL that are only in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution. ‘Internal inlinks’ are links in anchor elements pointing to a given URL from the same subdomain that is being crawled. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ 3 times, this would be counted as 3 inlinks and 1 unique inlink to ‘page B’.
  • % of Total – Percentage of unique internal inlinks (200 response HTML pages) to the URL from total internal HTML pages crawled. ‘Internal inlinks’ are links in anchor elements pointing to a given URI from the same subdomain that is being crawled.
  • Outlinks – Number of internal outlinks from the URL. ‘Internal outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to other URLs on the same subdomain that is being crawled.
  • Unique Outlinks – Number of unique internal outlinks from the URL. ‘Internal outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to other URLs on the same subdomain that is being crawled. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ on the same subdomain 3 times, this would be counted as 3 outlinks and 1 unique outlink to ‘page B’.
  • Unique JS Outlinks – Number of unique internal outlinks from the URL that are only in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution. ‘Internal outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to other URLs on the same subdomain that is being crawled. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ on the same subdomain 3 times, this would be counted as 3 outlinks and 1 unique outlink to ‘page B’.
  • External Outlinks – Number of external outlinks from the URL. ‘External outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to another subdomain.
  • Unique External Outlinks – Number of unique external outlinks from the URL. ‘External outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to another subdomain. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ on a different subdomain 3 times, this would be counted as 3 external outlinks and 1 unique external outlink to ‘page B’.
  • Unique External JS Outlinks – Number of unique external outlinks from the URL that are only in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution. ‘External outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to another subdomain. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ on a different subdomain 3 times, this would be counted as 3 external outlinks and 1 unique external outlink to ‘page B’.
  • Closest Similarity Match – This shows the highest similarity percentage of a near duplicate URL. The SEO Spider will identify near duplicates with a 90% similarity match, which can be adjusted to find content with a lower similarity threshold. For example, if there were two near duplicate pages for a page with 99% and 90% similarity respectively, then 99% will be displayed here. To populate this column the ‘Enable Near Duplicates’ configuration must be selected via ‘Config > Content > Duplicates’, and post ‘Crawl Analysis’ must be performed. Only URLs with content over the selected similarity threshold will contain data, the others will remain blank. Thus by default, this column will only contain data for URLs with 90% or higher similarity, unless it has been adjusted via the ‘Config > Content > Duplicates’ and ‘Near Duplicate Similarity Threshold’ setting.
  • No. Near Duplicates – The number of near duplicate URLs discovered in a crawl that meet or exceed the ‘Near Duplicate Similarity Threshold’, which is a 90% match by default. This setting can be adjusted under ‘Config > Content > Duplicates’. To populate this column the ‘Enable Near Duplicates’ configuration must be selected via ‘Config > Content > Duplicates’, and post ‘Crawl Analysis’ must be performed.
  • Spelling Errors – The total number of spelling errors discovered for a URL. For this column to be populated then ‘Enable Spell Check’ must be selected via ‘Config > Content > Spelling & Grammar’.
  • Grammar Errors – The total number of grammar errors discovered for a URL. For this column to be populated then ‘Enable Grammar Check’ must be selected via ‘Config > Content > Spelling & Grammar’.
  • Language – The language selected for spelling and grammar checks. This is based upon the HTML language attribute, but the language can also be set via ‘Config > Content > Spelling & Grammar’.
  • Hash – Hash value of the page using the MD5 algorithm. This is a duplicate content check for exact duplicate content only. If two hash values match, the pages are exactly the same in content. If there’s a single character difference, they will have unique hash values and not be detected as duplicate content. So this is not a check for near duplicate content. The exact duplicates can be seen under ‘URL > Duplicate’.
  • Response Time – Time in seconds to download the URL. More detailed information can be found in our FAQ.
  • Last-Modified – Read from the Last-Modified header in the servers HTTP response. If there server does not provide this the value will be empty.
  • Redirect URI – If the ‘address’ URL redirects, this column will include the redirect URL target. The status code above will display the type of redirect, 301, 302 etc.
  • Redirect Type – One of: HTTP Redirect: triggered by an HTTP header, HSTS Policy: Turned around locally by the SEO Spider due to a previous HSTS header, JavaScript Redirect: triggered by execution of JavaScript (can only happen when using JavaScript rendering) or MetaRefresh Redirect: triggered by a meta refresh tag in the HTML.
  • HTTP Version – This shows the HTTP version the crawl was under, which will be HTTP/1.1 by default. The SEO Spider currently only crawls using HTTP/2 in JavaScript rendering mode, if it’s enabled by the server.
  • URL Encoded Address – The URL actually requested by the SEO Spider. All non ASCII characters percent encoded, see RFC 3986 for further details.
  • Title 2, meta description 2, h1-2, h2-2 etc – The SEO Spider will collect data from the first two elements it encounters in the source code. Hence, h1-2 is data from the second h1 heading on the page.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • HTML – HTML pages.
  • JavaScript – Any JavaScript files.
  • CSS – Any style sheets discovered.
  • Images – Any images.
  • PDF – Any portable document files.
  • Flash – Any .swf files.
  • Other – Any other file types, like docs etc.
  • Unknown – Any URLs with an unknown content type. Either because it’s not been supplied, incorrect, or because the URL can’t be crawled. URLs blocked by robots.txt will also appear here, as their filetype is unknown for example.

External

The external tab includes data about external URLs. URLs classed as ‘External’ are on a different subdomain as the start page of the crawl.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The external URL address
  • Content – The content type of the URL.
  • Status Code – The HTTP response code.
  • Status – The HTTP header response.
  • Crawl Depth – Depth of the page from the homepage or start page (number of ‘clicks’ away from the start page).
  • Inlinks – Number of links found pointing to the external URL.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • HTML – HTML pages.
  • JavaScript – Any JavaScript files.
  • CSS – Any style sheets discovered.
  • Images – Any images.
  • PDF – Any portable document files.
  • Flash – Any .swf files.
  • Other – Any other file types, like docs etc.
  • Unknown – Any URLs with an unknown content type. Either because it’s not been supplied, or because the URL can’t be crawled. URLs blocked by robots.txt will also appear here, as their filetype is unknown for example.

Security

The security tab shows data related to security for internal URLs in a crawl.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Content – The content type of the URL.
  • Status Code – HTTP response code.
  • Status – The HTTP header response.
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if it’s canonicalised to another URL.
  • Canonical Link Element 1/2 etc – Canonical link element data on the URL. The Spider will find all instances if there are multiple.
  • Meta Robots 1/2 etc – Meta robots found on the URL. The Spider will find all instances if there are multiple.
  • X-Robots-Tag 1/2 etc – X-Robots-tag data. The Spider will find all instances if there are multiple.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • HTTP URLs – This filter will show insecure (HTTP) URLs. All websites should be secure over HTTPS today on the web. Not only is it important for security, but it’s now expected by users. Chrome and other browsers display a ‘Not Secure’ message against any URLs that are HTTP, or have mixed content issues (where they load insecure resources on them).
  • HTTPS URLs – The secure version of HTTP. All internal URLs should be over HTTPS and therefore should appear under this filter.
  • Mixed Content – This shows any HTML pages loaded over a secure HTTPS connection that have resources such as images, JavaScript or CSS that are loaded via an insecure HTTP connection. Mixed content weakens HTTPS, and makes the pages easier for eavesdropping and compromising otherwise secure pages. Browsers might automatically block the HTTP resources from loading, or they may attempt to upgrade them to HTTPS. All HTTP resources should be changed to HTTPS to avoid security issues, and problems loading in a browser.
  • Form URL Insecure – An HTML page has a form on it with an action attribute URL that is insecure (HTTP). This means that any data entered into the form is not secure, as it could be viewed in transit. All URLs contained within forms across a website should be encrypted and therefore need to be HTTPS.
  • Form on HTTP URL – This means a form is on an HTTP page. Any data entered into the form, including usernames and passwords is not secure. Chrome can display a ‘Not Secure’ message if it discovers a form with a password input field on an HTTP page.
  • Unsafe Cross-Origin Links – URLs that link to external websites using the target=”_blank” attribute (to open in a new tab), without using rel=”noopener” (or rel=”noreferrer”) at the same time. Using target=”_blank” alone leaves those pages exposed to both security and performance issues for some legacy browsers, which are estimated to be below 5% of market share. Setting target=”_blank” on anchor elements implicitly provides the same rel behavior as setting rel=”noopener” which does not set window.opener for most modern browsers, such as Chrome, Safari, Firefox and Edge.
  • Protocol-Relative Resource Links – This filter will show any pages that load resources such as images, JavaScript and CSS using protocol-relative links. A protocol-relative link is simply a link to a URL without specifying the scheme (for example, //screamingfrog.co.uk). It helps save developers time from having to specify the protocol and lets the browser determine it based upon the current connection to the resource. However, this technique is now an anti-pattern with HTTPS everywhere, and can expose some sites to ‘man in the middle’ compromises and performance issues.
  • Missing HSTS Header – Any URLs that are missing the HSTS response header. The HTTP Strict-Transport-Security response header (HSTS) instructs browsers that it should only be accessed using HTTPS, rather than HTTP. If a website accepts a connection to HTTP, before being redirected to HTTPS, visitors will initially still communicate over HTTP. The HSTS header instructs the browser to never load over HTTP and to automatically convert all requests to HTTPS.
  • Missing Content-Security-Policy Header – Any URLs that are missing the Content-Security-Policy response header. This header allows a website to control which resources are loaded for a page. This policy can help guard against cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks that exploit the browser’s trust of the content received from the server. The SEO Spider only checks for existence of the header, and does not interrogate the policies found within the header to determine whether they are well set-up for the website. This should be performed manually.
  • Missing X-Content-Type-Options Header – Any URLs that are missing the ‘X-Content-Type-Options’ response header with a ‘nosniff’ value. In the absence of a MIME type, browsers may ‘sniff’ to guess the content type to interpret it correctly for users. However, this can be exploited by attackers who can try and load malicious code, such as JavaScript via an image they have compromised. To minimise these security issues, the X-Content-Type-Options response header should be supplied and set to ‘nosniff’. This instructs browsers to rely only on the Content-Type header and block anything that does not match accurately.
  • Missing X-Frame-Options Header – Any URLs that are missing a X-Frame-Options response header with a ‘DENY’ or ‘SAMEORIGIN’ value. This instructs the browser not to render a page within a frame, iframe, embed or object. This helps avoid ‘click-jacking’ attacks, where your content is displayed on another web page that is controlled by an attacker.
  • Missing Secure Referrer-Policy Header – Any URLs that are missing ‘no-referrer-when-downgrade’, ‘strict-origin-when-cross-origin’, ‘no-referrer’ or ‘strict-origin’ policies in the Referrer-Policy header. When using HTTPS, it’s important that the URLs do not leak in non-HTTPS requests. This can expose users to ‘man in the middle’ attacks, as anyone on the network can view them.
  • Bad Content Type – This shows any URLs where the actual content type does not match the content type set in the header. It also identifies any invalid MIME types used. When the X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff response header is set by the server this is particularly important, as browsers rely on the content type header to correctly process the page. This can cause HTML web pages to be downloaded instead of being rendered when they are served with a MIME type other than text/html for example. Thus, all responses should have an accurate MIME type set in the content-type header.

To discover any HTTPS pages with insecure elements such as HTTP links, canonicals, pagination as well as mixed content (images, JS, CSS), we recommend using the ‘Insecure Content‘ report under the ‘Reports’ top level menu.

Response Codes

The response codes tab shows the HTTP status and status codes from internal and external URLs in a crawl. The filters group URLs by common response codes buckets.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Content – The content type of the URL.
  • Status Code – The HTTP response code.
  • Status – The HTTP header response.
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if it’s canonicalised to another URL.
  • Inlinks – Number of internal inlinks to the URL. ‘Internal inlinks’ are links pointing to a given URL from the same subdomain that is being crawled.
  • Response Time – Time in seconds to download the URL. More detailed information in can be found in our FAQ.
  • Redirect URL – If the address URL redirects, this column will include the redirect URL target. The status code above will display the type of redirect, 301, 302 etc.
  • Redirect Type – One of the following; HTTP Redirect: triggered by an HTTP header, HSTS Policy: turned around locally by the SEO Spider due to a previous HSTS header, JavaScript Redirect: triggered by execution of JavaScript (which can only occur when using JavaScript rendering) or Meta Refresh Redirect: triggered by a meta refresh tag in the HTML of the page.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters for both Internal and External URLs.

  • Blocked by Robots.txt – All URLs blocked by the site’s robots.txt. This means they cannot be crawled and is a critical issue if you want the page content to be crawled and indexed by search engines.
  • Blocked Resource – All resources such as images, JavaScript and CSS that are blocked from being rendered for a page. This can be either by robots.txt, or due to an error loading the file. This filter will only populate when JavaScript rendering is enabled (blocked resources will appear under ‘Blocked by Robots.txt’ in default ‘text only’ crawl mode). This can be an issue as the search engines might not be able to access critical resources to be able to render pages accurately.
  • No Response – When the URL does not send a response to the SEO Spiders HTTP request. Typically a malformed URL, connection timeout, connection refused or connection error. Malformed URLs should be updated and other connection issues can often be resolved by adjusting the SEO Spider configuration.
  • Success (2XX) – The URL requested was received, understood, accepted and processed successfully. Ideally all URLs encountered in a crawl would be a status code ‘200’ with a ‘OK’ status, which is perfect for crawling and indexing of content.
  • Redirection (3XX) – A redirection was encountered. These will include server-side redirects, such as 301 or 302 redirects. Ideally all internal links would be to canonical resolving URLs, and avoid linking to URLs that redirect. This reduces latency of redirect hops for users.
  • Redirection (JavaScript) – A JavaScript redirect was encountered. Ideally all internal links would be to canonical resolving URLs, and avoid linking to URLs that redirect. This reduces latency of redirect hops for users.
  • Redirection (Meta Refresh) – A meta refresh was encountered. Ideally all internal links would be to canonical resolving URLs, and avoid linking to URLs that redirect. This reduces latency of redirect hops for users.
  • Redirect Chain – Internal URLs that redirect to another URL, which also then redirects. This can occur multiple times in a row, each redirect is referred to as a ‘hop’. Full redirect chains can be viewed and exported via ‘Reports > Redirects > Redirect Chains’.
  • Redirect Loop – Internal URLs that redirect to another URL, which also then redirects. This can occur multiple times in a row, each redirect is referred to as a ‘hop’. This filter will only populate if a URL redirects to a previous URL within the redirect chain. Redirect chains with a loop can be viewed and exported via ‘Reports > Redirects > Redirect Chains’ with the ‘Loop’ column filtered to ‘True’.
  • Client Error (4xx) – Indicates a problem occurred with the request. This can include responses such as 400 bad request, 403 Forbidden, 404 Page Not Found, 410 Removed, 429 Too Many Requests and more. All links on a website should ideally resolve to 200 ‘OK’ URLs. Errors such as 404s should be updated to their correct locations, removed and redirected where appropriate.
  • Server Error (5XX) – The server failed to fulfil an apparently valid request. This can include common responses such as 500 Internal Sever Errors and 503 Server Unavailable. All URLs should respond with a 200 ‘OK’ status and this might indicate a server that struggles under load or a misconfiguration that requires investigation.

Please see our Learn SEO guide on HTTP Status Codes, or to troubleshoot responses when using the SEO Spider, read our HTTP Status Codes When Crawling tutorial.

URL

The URL tab shows data related to the URLs discovered in a crawl. The filters show common issues discovered for URLs.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Content – The content type of the URL.
  • Status Code – HTTP response code.
  • Status – The HTTP header response.
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if it’s canonicalised to another URL.
  • Hash – Hash value of the page. This is a duplicate content check. If two hash values match the pages are exactly the same in content.
  • Length – The character length of the URL.
  • Canonical 1 – The canonical link element data.
  • URL Encoded Address – The URL actually requested by the SEO Spider. All non-ASCII characters percent encoded, see RFC 3986 for further details.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Non ASCII Characters – The URL has characters in it that are not included in the ASCII character-set. Standards outline that URLs can only be sent using the ASCII character-set and some users may have difficulty with subtleties of characters outside this range. URLs must be converted into a valid ASCII format, by encoding links to the URL with safe characters (made up of % followed by two hexadecimal digits). Today browsers and the search engines are largely able to transform URLs accurately.
  • Underscores – The URL has underscores within it, which are not always seen as word separators by search engines. Hyphens are recommended for word separators.
  • Uppercase – The URL has uppercase characters within it. URLs are case sensitive, so as best practice generally URLs should be lowercase, to avoid any potential mix ups and duplicate URLs.
  • Multiple Slashes – The URL has multiple forward slashes in the path (for example, screamingfrog.co.uk/seo//). This is generally by mistake and as best practice URLs should only have a single slash between sections of a path to avoid any potential mix ups and duplicate URLs.
  • Repetitive Path – The URL has a path that is repeated in the URL string (for example, screamingfrog.co.uk/services/seo/technical/seo/). In some cases this can be legitimate and logical, however it also often points to poor URL structure and potential improvements. It can also help identify issues with incorrect relative linking, causing infinite URLs.
  • Contains A Space – The URL has a space in it. These are considered unsafe and could cause the link to be broken when sharing the URL. Hyphens should be used as word separators instead of spaces.
  • Internal Search – The URL might be part of the websites internal search function. Google and other search engines recommend blocking internal search pages from being crawled. To avoid Google indexing the blocked internal search URLs, they should not be discoverable via internal links either.
  • Parameters – The URL includes parameters such as ‘?’ or ‘&’ in it. This isn’t an issue for Google or other search engines to crawl, but it’s recommended to limit the number of parameters in a URL which can be complicated for users, and can be a sign of low value-add URLs.
  • Broken Bookmark – URLs that have a broken bookmark (also known as ‘named anchors’, ‘jump links’, and ‘skip links’) that link users to a specific part of a webpage using an ID attribute in the HTML and append a fragment (#) and the ID name to the URL. When the link is clicked, the page will scroll to the location with the bookmark. While these links can be excellent for users, it’s easy to make mistakes in the set-up, and they often become ‘broken’ over time as pages are updated and IDs are changed or removed. A broken bookmark will mean the user is still taken to the correct page, but they won’t be directed to the intended section. While Google will see these URLs as the same page (as it ignores anything from the #), they can use named anchors for ‘jump to’ links in their search results for the page ranking. Please see our guide on how to find broken bookmarks.
  • GA Tracking Parameters – URLs that contain Google Analytics tracking parameters. In addition to creating duplicate pages that must be crawled, using tracking parameters on links internally can overwrite the original session data. utm= parameters strip the original source of traffic and starts a new session with the specified attributes. _ga= and _gl= parameters are used for cross-domain linking and identify a specific user, including this on links prevents a unique user ID from being assigned.
  • Over 115 characters – The URL is over 115 characters in length. This is not necessarily an issue, however research has shown that users prefer shorter, concise URL strings.

Please see our Learn SEO guide on URL Structure.

Page titles

The page title tab includes data related to page title elements of internal URLs in the crawl. The filters show common issues discovered for page titles.

The page title, often referred to as the ‘title tag’, ‘meta title’ or sometimes ‘SEO title’ is an HTML element in the head of a webpage that describes the purpose of the page to users and search engines. They are widely considered to be one of the strongest on-page ranking signals for a page.

The page title element should be placed in the head of the document and looks like this in HTML:

<title>This Is A Page Title</title>


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Occurrences – The number of page titles found on the page (the maximum the SEO Spider will find is 2).
  • Title 1/2 – The content of the page title elements.
  • Title 1/2 length – The character length of the page title(s).
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is Indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if the URL is canonicalised to another URL, or has a ‘noindex’ etc.

Filters

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Missing – Any pages which have a missing page title element, the content is empty or has a whitespace. Page titles are read and used by both users and the search engines to understand the purpose of a page. So it’s critical that pages have concise, descriptive and unique page titles.
  • Duplicate – Any pages which have duplicate page titles. It’s really important to have distinct and unique page titles for every page. If every page has the same page title, then it can make it more challenging for users and the search engines to understand one page from another.
  • Over 60 characters – Any pages which have page titles over 60 characters in length. Characters over this limit might be truncated in Google’s search results and carry less weight in scoring.
  • Below 30 characters – Any pages which have page titles under 30 characters in length. This isn’t necessarily an issue, but you have more room to target additional keywords or communicate your USPs.
  • Over X Pixels – Google snippet length is actually based upon pixels limits, rather than a character length. The SEO Spider tries to match the latest pixel truncation points in the SERPs, but it is an approximation and Google adjusts them frequently. This filter shows any pages which have page titles over X pixels in length.
  • Below X Pixels – Any pages which have page titles under X pixels in length. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but you have more room to target additional keywords or communicate your USPs.
  • Same as h1 – Any page titles which match the h1 on the page exactly. This is not necessarily an issue, but may point to a potential opportunity to target alternative keywords, synonyms, or related key phrases.
  • Multiple – Any pages which have multiple page titles. There should only be a single page title element for a page. Multiple page titles are often caused by multiple conflicting plugins or modules in CMS.
  • Outside <head> – Pages with a title element that is outside of the head element in the HTML. The page title should be within the head element, or search engines may ignore it. Google will often still recognise the page title even outside of the head element, however this should not be relied upon.

Please see our Learn SEO guide on writing Page Titles.

Meta description

The meta description tab includes data related to meta descriptions of internal URLs in the crawl. The filters show common issues discovered for meta descriptions.

The meta description is an HTML attribute in the head of a webpage that provides a summary of the page to users. The words in a description are not used in ranking by Google, but they can be shown in the search results to users, and therefore heavily influence click through rates.

The meta description should be placed in the head of the document and looks like this in HTML:

<meta name="description" content="This is a meta description."/>


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Occurrences – The number of meta descriptions found on the page (the maximum we find is 2).
  • Meta Description 1/2 – The meta description.
  • Meta Description 1/2 length – The character length of the meta description.
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if the URL is canonicalised to another URL.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Missing – Any pages which have a missing meta description, the content is empty or has a whitespace. This is a missed opportunity to communicate the benefits of your product or service and influence click through rates for important URLs.
  • Duplicate – Any pages which have duplicate meta descriptions. It’s really important to have distinct and unique meta descriptions that communicate the benefits and purpose of each page. If they are duplicate or irrelevant, then they will be ignored by search engines.
  • Over 155 characters – Any pages which have meta descriptions over 155 characters in length. Characters over this limit might be truncated in Google’s search results.
  • Below 70 characters – Any pages which have meta descriptions below 70 characters in length. This isn’t strictly an issue, but an opportunity. There is additional room to communicate benefits, USPs or call to actions.
  • Over X Pixels – Google snippet length is actually based upon pixels limits, rather than a character length. The SEO Spider tries to match the latest pixel truncation points in the SERPs, but it is an approximation and Google adjusts them frequently. This filter shows any pages which have descriptions over X pixels in length and might be truncated in Google’s search results.
  • Below X Pixels – Any pages which have meta descriptions under X pixels in length. This isn’t strictly an issue, but an opportunity. There is additional room to communicate benefits, USPs or call to actions.
  • Multiple – Any pages which have multiple meta descriptions. There should only be a single meta description for a page. Multiple meta descriptions are often caused by multiple conflicting plugins or modules in CMS.
  • Outside <head> – Pages with a meta description that is outside of the head element in the HTML. The meta description should be within the head element, or search engines may ignore it.

Please see our Learn SEO guide on writing Meta Descriptions.

Meta keywords

The meta keywords tab includes data related to meta keywords. The filters show common issues discovered for meta keywords.

Meta keywords are widely ignored by search engines and they are not used as a signal in scoring for all major Western search engines. In particular Google does not consider it at all in their scoring of pages in ranking of their search results. Therefore we recommend ignoring it completely unless you are targeting alternative search engines.

Other search engines such as Yandex or Baidu may still use them in ranking, but we recommend performing research to this status before taking the time to optimise them.

The meta keywords tag should be placed in the head of the document and looks like this in HTML
:
<meta name="keywords" content="seo, seo agency, seo services"/>


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Occurrences – The number of meta keywords found on the page (the maximum we find is 2).
  • Meta Keyword 1/2 – The meta keywords.
  • Meta Keyword 1/2 length – The character length of the meta keywords.
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if it’s canonicalised to another URL.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Missing – Any pages which have a missing meta keywords. If you’re targeting Google, Bing and Yahoo then this is fine as they do not use them in ranking. If you’re targeting Baidu or Yandex, then you may wish to consider including relevant target keywords.
  • Duplicate – Any pages which have duplicate meta keywords. If you’re targeting Baidu or Yandex, then unique keywords relevant to the purpose of the page are recommended.
  • Multiple – Any pages which have multiple meta keywords. There should only be a single tag on the page.

h1

The h1 tab shows data related to the <h1> heading of a page. The filters show common issues discovered for <h1>s.

The <h1> to <h6> tags are used to define HTML headings. The <h1> is considered as the most important first main heading of a page, and <h6> as the least important.

Headings should ordered by size and importance and they help users and search engines understand the content on the page and sections. The <h1> should describe the main title and purpose of the page and are widely considered to be one of the stronger on-page ranking signals.

The <h1> element should be placed in the body of the document and looks like this in HTML:

<h1>This Is An h1</h1>

By default, the SEO Spider will only extract and report on the first two <h1>’s discovered on a page. If you wish to extract all h1s, then we recommend using custom extraction.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Occurrences – The number of <h1>s found on the page. As outlined above, the maximum we find is 2.
  • h1-1/2 – The content of the <h1>.
  • h1-length-1/2 – The character length of the <h1>.
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if it’s canonicalised to another URL.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Missing – Any pages which have a missing <h1>, the content is empty or has a whitespace. <h1>’s are read and used by both users and the search engines to understand the purpose of a page. So it’s critical that pages have concise, descriptive and unique headings.
  • Duplicate – Any pages which have duplicate <h1>s. It’s important to have distinct, unique and useful pages. If every page has the same <h1>, then it can make it more challenging for users and the search engines to understand one page from another.
  • Over 70 characters – Any pages which have <h1> over 70 characters in length. This is not strictly an issue, as there isn’t a character limit for headings. However, they should be concise and descriptive for users and search engines.
  • Multiple – Any pages which have multiple <h1>. While this is not strictly an issue because HTML5 standards allow multiple <h1>s on a page, there are some problems with this modern approach in terms of usability. It’s advised to use heading rank (h1–h6) to convey document structure. The classic HTML4 standard defines there should only be a single <h1> per page, and this is still generally recommended for users and SEO.
  • Alt Text in h1 – Pages which have image alt text within an h1. This can be because text within the image is considered as the main heading on the page, or due to inappropriate mark-up. Some CMS templates will automatically include an h1 around a logo across a website. While there are strong arguments that text rather than alt text should be used for headings, search engines may understand alt text within an h1 as part of the h1 and score accordingly.
  • Non-sequential – Pages with an h1 that is not the first heading on the page. Heading elements should be in a logical sequentially-descending order. The purpose of heading elements is to convey the structure of the page and they should be in logical order from h1 to h6, which helps navigating the page and users that rely on assistive technologies.

Please see our Learn SEO guide on Heading Tags.

h2

The h2 tab shows data related to the <h2> heading of a page. The filters show common issues discovered for <h2>s.

The <h1> to <h6> tags are used to define HTML headings. The <h2> is considered as the second important heading of a page and is generally sized and styled as the second largest heading.

The <h2> heading is often used to describe sections or topics within a document. They act as sign posts for the user, and can help search engines understand the page.

The <h2> element should be placed in the body of the document and looks like this in HTML:

<h2>This Is An h2</h2>

By default, the SEO Spider will only extract and report on the first two h2’s discovered on a page. If you wish to extract all h2s, then we recommend using custom extraction.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Occurrences – The number of <h2>s found on the page. As outlined above, the maximum we find is 2.
  • h2-1/2 – The content of the <h2>.
  • h2-length-1/2 – The character length of the <h2>.
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if it’s canonicalised to another URL.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Missing – Any pages which have a missing <h2>, the content is empty or has a whitespace. <h2>’s are read and used by both users and the search engines to understand the page and sections. Ideally most pages would have logical, descriptive <h2>s.
  • Duplicate – Any pages which have duplicate <h2>s. It’s important to have distinct, unique and useful pages. If every page has the same <h2>, then it can make it more challenging for users and the search engines to understand one page from another.
  • Over 70 characters – Any pages which have <h2> over 70 characters in length. This is not strictly an issue, as there isn’t a character limit for headings. However, they should be concise and descriptive for users and search engines.
  • Multiple – Any pages which have multiple <h2>s. This is not an issue as HTML standards allow multiple <h2>’s when used in a logical hierachical heading structure. However, this filter can help you quickly scan to review if they are used appropriately.
  • Non-sequential – Pages with an h2 that is not the second heading level after the h1 on the page. Heading elements should be in a logical sequentially-descending order. The purpose of heading elements is to convey the structure of the page and they should be in logical order from h1 to h6, which helps navigating the page and users that rely on assistive technologies.

Please see our Learn SEO guide on Heading Tags.

Content

The ‘Content’ tab shows data related to the content of internal HTML URLs discovered in a crawl.

This includes word count, readability, duplicate and near duplicate content, and spelling and grammar errors.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL address.
  • Word Count – This is all ‘words’ inside the body tag, excluding HTML markup. The count is based upon the content area that can be adjusted under ‘Config > Content > Area’. By default, the nav and footer elements are excluded. You can include or exclude HTML elements, classes and IDs to calculate a refined word count. Our figures may not be exactly what performing this calculation manually would find, as the parser performs certain fix-ups on invalid HTML. Your rendering settings also affect what HTML is considered. Our definition of a word is taking the text and splitting it by spaces. No consideration is given to visibility of content (such as text inside a div set to hidden).
  • Average Words Per Sentence – The total number of words from the content area, divided by the total number of sentences discovered. This is calculated as part of the Flesch readability analysis.
  • Flesch Reading Ease Score – The Flesch reading ease test measures the readability of text. It’s a widely used readability formula, which uses the average length of sentences, and average number of syllables per word to provide a score between 0-100. 0 is very difficult to read and best understood by university graduates, while 100 is very easy to read and can be understood by an 11 year old student.
  • Readability – The overall readability assessment classification based upon the Flesch Reading Ease Score and documented score groups.
  • Closest Similarity Match – This shows the highest similarity percentage of a near duplicate URL. The SEO Spider will identify near duplicates with a 90% similarity match, which can be adjusted to find content with a lower similarity threshold. For example, if there were two near duplicate pages for a page with 99% and 90% similarity respectively, then 99% will be displayed here. To populate this column the ‘Enable Near Duplicates’ configuration must be selected via ‘Config > Content > Duplicates‘, and post ‘Crawl Analysis‘ must be performed. Only URLs with content over the selected similarity threshold will contain data, the others will remain blank. Thus by default, this column will only contain data for URLs with 90% or higher similarity, unless it has been adjusted via the ‘Config > Content > Duplicates’ and ‘Near Duplicate Similarity Threshold’ setting.
  • No. Near Duplicates – The number of near duplicate URLs discovered in a crawl that meet or exceed the ‘Near Duplicate Similarity Threshold’, which is a 90% match by default. This setting can be adjusted under ‘Config > Content > Duplicates’. To populate this column the ‘Enable Near Duplicates’ configuration must be selected via ‘Config > Content > Duplicates‘, and post ‘Crawl Analysis‘ must be performed.
  • Total Language Errors – The total number of spelling and grammar errors discovered for a URL. For this column to be populated then either ‘Enable Spell Check’ or ‘Enable Grammar Check’ must be selected via ‘Config > Content > Spelling & Grammar‘.
  • Spelling Errors – The total number of spelling errors discovered for a URL. For this column to be populated then ‘Enable Spell Check’ must be selected via ‘Config > Content > Spelling & Grammar‘.
  • Grammar Errors – The total number of grammar errors discovered for a URL. For this column to be populated then ‘Enable Grammar Check’ must be selected via ‘Config > Content > Spelling & Grammar’.
  • Language – The language selected for spelling and grammar checks. This is based upon the HTML language attribute, but the language can also be set via ‘Config > Content > Spelling & Grammar‘.
  • Hash – Hash value of the page using the MD5 algorithm. This is a duplicate content check for exact duplicate content only. If two hash values match, the pages are exactly the same in content. If there’s a single character difference, they will have unique hash values and not be detected as duplicate content. So this is not a check for near duplicate content. The exact duplicates can be seen under ‘Content > Exact Duplicates’.
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is Indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if it’s canonicalised to another URL.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Exact Duplicates – This filter will show pages that are identical to each other using the MD5 algorithm which calculates a ‘hash’ value for each page and can be seen in the ‘hash’ column. This check is performed against the full HTML of the page. It will show all pages with matching hash values that are exactly the same. Exact duplicate pages can lead to the splitting of PageRank signals and unpredictability in ranking. There should only be a single canonical version of a URL that exists and is linked to internally. Other versions should not be linked to, and they should be 301 redirected to the canonical version.
  • Near Duplicates – This filter will show similar pages based upon the configured similarity threshold using the minhash algorithm. The threshold can be adjusted under ‘Config > Content > Duplicates’ and is set at 90% by default. The ‘Closest Similarity Match’ column displays the highest percentage of similarity to another page. The ‘No. Near Duplicates’ column displays the number of pages that are similar to the page based upon the similarity threshold. The algorithm is run against text on the page, rather than the full HTML like exact duplicates. The content used for this analysis can be configured under ‘Config > Content > Area’. Pages can have a 100% similarity, but only be a ‘near duplicate’ rather than exact duplicate. This is because exact duplicates are excluded as near duplicates, to avoid them being flagged twice. Similarity scores are also rounded, so 99.5% or higher will be displayed as 100%. To populate this column the ‘Enable Near Duplicates’ configuration must be selected via ‘Config > Content > Duplicates‘, and post ‘Crawl Analysis‘ must be performed.
  • Low Content Pages – This will show any HTML pages with a word count below 200 words by default. The word count is based upon the content area settings used in the analysis which can be configured via ‘Config > Content > Area’. There isn’t a minimum word count for pages in reality, but the search engines do require descriptive text to understand the purpose of a page. This filter should only be used as a rough guide to help identify pages that might be improved by adding more descriptive content in the context of the website and page’s purpose. Some websites, such as ecommerce, will naturally have lower word counts, which can be acceptable if a products details can be communicated efficiently. The word count used for the low content pages filter can be adjusted via ‘Config > Spider > Preferences > Low Content Word Count‘ to your own preferences.
  • Soft 404 Pages – Pages that respond with a ‘200’ status code suggesting they are ‘OK’, but appear to be an error page – often referred to as a ‘404’ or ‘page not found’. These typically should respond with a 404 status code if the page is no longer available. These pages are identified by looking for common error text used on pages, such as ‘Page Not Found’, or ‘404 Page Can’t Be Found’. The text used to identify these pages can be configured under ‘Config > Spider > Preferences’.
  • Spelling Errors – This filter contains any HTML pages with spelling errors. For this filter and respective columns to be populated then ‘Enable Spell Check’ must be selected via ‘Config > Content > Spelling & Grammar‘.
  • Grammar Errors – This filter contains any HTML pages with grammar errors. For this column to be populated then ‘Enable Grammar Check’ must be selected via ‘Config > Content > Spelling & Grammar‘.
  • Readability Difficult – Copy on the page is difficult to read and best understood by college graduates according to the Flesch reading-ease score formula. Copy that has long sentences and uses complex words are generally harder to read and understand. Consider improving the readability of copy for your target audience. Copy that uses shorter sentences with less complex words is often easier to read and understand.
  • Readability Very Difficult – Copy on the page is very difficult to read and best understood by university graduates according to the Flesch reading-ease score formula. Copy that has long sentences and uses complex words are generally harder to read and understand. Consider improving the readability of copy for your target audience. Copy that uses shorter sentences with less complex words is often easier to read and understand.
  • Lorem Ipsum Placeholder – Pages that contain ‘Lorem ipsum’ text that is commonly used as a placeholder to demonstrate the visual form of a webpage. This can be left on web pages by mistake, particularly during new website builds.

Please see our Learn SEO guide on duplicate content, and our ‘How To Check For Duplicate Content‘ tutorial.

Images

The images tab shows data related to any images discovered in a crawl. This includes both internal and external images, discovered by either <img src= tags, or <a href= tags. The filters show common issues discovered for images and their alt text.

Image alt attributes (often referred to incorrectly as ‘alt tags’) can be viewed by clicking on an image and then the ‘Image Details’ tab at the bottom, which populates the lower window tab.

Alt attributes should specify relevant and descriptive alternative text about the purpose of an image and appear in the source of the HTML like the below example.

<img src="screamingfrog-logo.jpg" alt="Screaming Frog" />

Decorative images should provide a null (empty) alt text (alt=””) so that they can be ignored by assistive technologies, such as screen readers, rather than not including an alt attribute at all.

<img src="decorative-frog-space.jpg" alt="" />


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Content – The content type of the image (jpeg, gif, png etc).
  • Size – Size of the image in kilobytes. File size is in bytes in the export, so divide by 1,024 to convert to kilobytes.
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if it’s canonicalised to another URL.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Over 100kb – Large images over 100kb in size. Page speed is extremely important for users and SEO and often large resources such as images are one of the most common issues that slow down web pages. This filter simply acts as a general rule of thumb to help identify images that are fairly large in file size and may take longer to load. These should be considered for optimisation, alongside opportunities identified in the PageSpeed tab which uses the PSI API and Lighthouse to audit speed. This can help identify images that haven’t been optimised in size, load offscreen, are unoptimised etc.
  • Missing Alt Text – Images that have an alt attribute, but are missing alt text. Click the address (URL) of the image and then the ‘Image Details’ tab in the lower window pane to view which pages have the image on, and which pages are missing alt text of the said image. Images should have descriptive alternative text about it’s purpose, which helps the blind and visually impaired and the search engines understand it and it’s relevance to the web page. For decorative images a null (empty) alt text should be provided (alt=””) so that they can be ignored by assistive technologies, such as screen readers.
  • Missing Alt Attribute – Images that are missing an alt attribute all together. Click the address (URL) of the image and then the ‘Image Details’ tab in the lower window pane to view which pages have the image on, and are missing alt attributes. All images should contain an alt attribute with descriptive text, or blank when it’s a decorative image.
  • Alt Text Over 100 Characters – Images which have one instance of alt text over 100 characters in length. This is not strictly an issue, however image alt text should be concise and descriptive. It should not be used to stuff lots of keywords or paragraphs of text onto a page.
  • Background Images – CSS background and dynamically loaded images discovered across the website, which should be used for non-critical and decorative purposes. Background images are not typically indexed by Google and browsers do not provide alt attributes or text on background images to assistive technology. For this filter to populate, JavaScript rendering must be enabled, and crawl analysis needs to be performed.
  • Missing Size Attributes – Image elements without dimensions (width and height size attributes) specified in the HTML. This can cause large layout shifts as the page loads and be frustrating experience for users. It is one of the major reasons that contributes to a high Cumulative Layout Shift (CLS).
  • Incorrectly Sized Images – Images identified where their real dimensions (WxH) do not match the display dimensions when rendered. If there is an estimated 4kb file size difference or more, the image is flagged for potential optimisation. In particular, this can help identify oversized images, which can contribute to poor page load speed. It can also help identify smaller sized images, that are being stretched when rendered. For this filter to populate, JavaScript rendering must be enabled, and crawl analysis needs to be performed.

For more on optimising images, please read our guide on How To View Alt Text & Find Missing Alt Text and consider using the the PageSpeed Insights Integration. This has opportunities and diagnostics for ‘Properly Size Images’, ‘Defer Offscreen Images’, ‘Efficiently Encode Images’, ‘Serve Images in Next-Gen Formats’ and ‘Image Elements Do Not Have Explicit Width & Height’.

Canonicals

The canonicals tab shows canonical link elements and HTTP canonicals discovered during a crawl. The filters show common issues discovered for canonicals.

The rel=”canonical” element helps specify a single preferred version of a page when it’s available via multiple URLs. It’s a hint to the search engines to help prevent duplicate content, by consolidating indexing and link properties to a single URL to use in ranking.

The canonical link element should be placed in the head of the document and looks like this in HTML:

<link rel="canonical" href="https://www.example.com/" >

You can also use rel=”canonical” HTTP headers, which looks like this:

Link: <http://www.example.com>; rel="canonical"


    Columns

    This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Occurrences – The number of canonicals found (via both link element and HTTP).
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if it’s canonicalised to another URL.
  • Canonical Link Element 1/2 etc – Canonical link element data on the URL. The SEO Spider will find all instances if there are multiple.
  • HTTP Canonical 1/2 etc – Canonical issued via HTTP. The SEO Spider will find all instances if there are multiple.
  • Meta Robots 1/2 etc – Meta robots found on the URL. The SEO Spider will find all instances if there are multiple.
  • X-Robots-Tag 1/2 etc – X-Robots-tag data. The SEO Spider will find all instances if there are multiple.
  • rel=“next” and rel=“prev” – The SEO Spider collects these HTML link elements designed to indicate the relationship between URLs in a paginated series.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Contains Canonical – The page has a canonical URL set (either via link element, HTTP header or both). This could be a self-referencing canonical URL where the page URL is the same as the canonical URL, or it could be ‘canonicalised’, where the canonical URL is different to the page URL.
  • Self Referencing – The URL has a canonical which is the same URL as the page URL crawled (hence, it’s self referencing). Ideally only canonical versions of URLs would be linked to internally, and every URL would have a self-referencing canonical to help avoid any potential duplicate content issues that can occur (even naturally on the web, such as tracking parameters on URLs, other websites incorrectly linking to a URL that resolves etc).
  • Canonicalised – The page has a canonical URL that is different to itself. The URL is ‘canonicalised’ to another location. This means the search engines are being instructed to not index the page, and the indexing and linking properties should be consolidated to the target canonical URL. These URLs should be reviewed carefully. In a perfect world, a website wouldn’t need to canonicalise any URLs as only canonical versions would be linked to, but often they are required due to various circumstances outside of control, and to prevent duplicate content.
  • Missing – There’s no canonical URL present either as a link element, or via HTTP header. If a page doesn’t indicate a canonical URL, Google will identify what they think is the best version or URL. This can lead to ranking unpredicatability, and hence generally all URLs should specify a canonical version.
  • Multiple – There’s multiple canonicals set for a URL (either multiple link elements, HTTP header, or both combined). This can lead to unpredictability, as there should only be a single canonical URL set by a single implementation (link element, or HTTP header) for a page.
  • Multiple Conflicting – Pages with multiple canonicals set for a URL that have different URLs specified (via either multiple link elements, HTTP header, or both combined). This can lead to unpredictability, as there should only be a single canonical URL set by a single implementation (link element, or HTTP header) for a page.
  • Non-Indexable Canonical – The canonical URL is a non-indexable page. This will include canonicals which are blocked by robots.txt, no response, redirect (3XX), client error (4XX), server error (5XX) or are ‘noindex’. Canonical versions of URLs should always be indexable, ‘200’ response pages. Therefore, canonicals that go to non-indexable pages should be corrected to the resolving indexable versions.
  • Canonical Is Relative – Pages that have a relative rather than absolute rel=”canonical” link tag. While the tag, like many HTML tags, accepts both relative and absolute URLs, it’s easy to make subtle mistakes with relative paths that could cause indexing-related issues.
  • Unlinked – URLs that are only discoverable via rel=”canonical” and are not linked-to via hyperlinks on the website. This might be a sign of a problem with internal linking, or the URLs contained in the canonical.
  • Outside <head> – Pages with a canonical link element that is outside of the head element in the HTML. The canonical link element should be within the head element, or search engines will ignore it.

Please see our Learn SEO guide on canonicals, and our ‘How to Audit Canoncials‘ tutorial.

Directives

The directives tab shows data related to the meta robots tag, and the X-Robots-Tag in the HTTP Header. These robots directives can control how your content and URLs are displayed in search engines, such as Google.

The meta robots tag should be placed in the head of the document and an example of a ‘noindex’ meta tag looks like this in HTML:

<meta name="robots" content="noindex"/>

The same directive can be issued in the HTTP header using the X-Robots-Tag, which looks like this:

X-Robots-Tag: noindex


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Meta Robots 1/2 etc – Meta robots directives found on the URL. The SEO Spider will find all instances if there are multiple.
  • X-Robots-Tag 1/2 etc – X-Robots-tag HTTP header directives for the URL. The SEO Spider will find all instances if there are multiple.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Index – This allows the page to be indexed. It’s unnecessary, as search engines will index URLs without it.
  • Noindex – This instructs the search engines not to index the page. The page will still be crawled (to see the directive), but it will then be dropped from the index. URLs with a ‘noindex’ should be inspected carefully.
  • Follow – This instructs any links on the page to be followed for crawling. It’s unnecessary, as search engines will follow them by default.
  • Nofollow – This is a ‘hint’ which tells the search engines not to follow any links on the page for crawling. This is generally used by mistake in combination with ‘noindex’, when there is no need to include this directive. To crawl pages with a meta nofollow tag the configuration ‘Follow Internal Nofollow’ must be enabled under ‘Config > Spider’.
  • None – This does not mean there are no directives in place. It means the meta tag ‘none’ is being used, which is the equivalent to “noindex, nofollow”. These URLs should be reviewed carefully to ensure they are being correctly kept out of the search engines indexes.
  • NoArchive – This instructs Google not to show a cached link for a page in the search results.
  • NoSnippet – This instructs Google not to show a text snippet or video preview from being shown in the search results.
  • Max-Snippet – This value allows you to limit the text snippet length for this page to [number] characters in Google. Special values include – 0 for no snippet, or -1 to allow any snippet length.
  • Max-Image-Preview – This value can limit the size of any image associated with this page in Google. Setting values can be “none”, “standard”, or “large”.
  • Max-Video-Preview – This value can limit any video preview associated with this page to [number] seconds in Google. You can also specify 0 to allow only a still image, or -1 to allow any preview length.
  • NoODP – This is an old meta tag that used to instruct Google not to use the Open Directory Project for its snippets. This can be removed.
  • NoYDIR – This is an old meta tag that used to instruct Google not to use the Yahoo Directory for its snippets. This can be removed.
  • NoImageIndex – This tells Google not to show the page as the referring page for an image in the Image search results. This has the effect of preventing all images on this page from being indexed in this page.
  • NoTranslate – This value tells Google that you don’t want them to provide a translation for this page.
  • Unavailable_After – This allows you to specify the exact time and date you want Google to stop showing the page in their search results.
  • Refresh – This redirects the user to a new URL after a certain amount of time. We recommend reviewing meta refresh data within the response codes tab.
  • Outside <head> – Pages with a meta robots that is outside of the head element in the HTML. The meta robots should be within the head element, or search engines may ignore it. Google will typically still recognise meta robots such as a ‘noindex’ directive, even outside of the head element, however this should not be relied upon.

In this tab we also display columns for meta refresh and canonicals. However, we recommend reviewing meta refresh data within the response codes tab and relevant filter, and canonicals within the canonicals tab.

hreflang

The hreflang tab includes details of hreflang annotations crawled by the SEO Spider, delivered by HTML link element, HTTP Header or XML Sitemap. The filters show common issues discovered for hreflang.

Hreflang is useful when you have multiple versions of a page for different languages or regions. It tells Google about these different variations and helps them show the most appropriate version of your page by language or region.

Hreflang link elements should be placed in the head of the document and looks like this in HTML:

<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-gb" href="https://www.example.com" >
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-us" href="https://www.example.com/us/" >

Store Hreflang‘ and ‘Crawl Hreflang‘ options need to be enabled (under ‘Config > Spider’) for this tab and respective filters to be populated. To extract hreflang annotations from XML Sitemaps during a regular crawl ‘Crawl Linked XML Sitemaps‘ must be selected as well.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Title 1/2 etc – The page title element of the page.
  • Occurrences – The number of hreflang discovered on a page.
  • HTML hreflang 1/2 etc – The hreflang language and region code from any HTML link element on the page.
  • HTML hreflang 1/2 URL etc – The hreflang URL from any HTML link element on the page.
  • HTTP hreflang 1/2 etc – The hreflang language and region code from the HTTP Header.
  • HTTP hreflang 1/2 URL etc – The hreflang URL from the HTTP Header.
  • Sitemap hreflang 1/2 etc – The hreflang language and region code from the XML Sitemap. Please note, this only populates when crawling the XML Sitemap in list mode.
  • Sitemap hreflang 1/2 URL etc – The hreflang URL from the XML Sitemap. Please note, this only populates when crawling the XML Sitemap in list mode.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Contains Hreflang – These are simply any URLs that have rel=”alternate” hreflang annotations from any implementation, whether link element, HTTP header or XML Sitemap.
  • Non-200 Hreflang URLs – These are URLs contained within rel=”alternate” hreflang annotations that do not have a 200 response code, such as URLs blocked by robots.txt, no responses, 3XX (redirects), 4XX (client errors) or 5XX (server errors). Hreflang URLs must be crawlable and indexable and therefore non-200 URLs are treated as errors, and ignored by the search engines. The non-200 hreflang URLs can be seen in the lower window ‘URL Info’ pane with a ‘non-200’ confirmation status. They can be exported in bulk via the ‘Reports > Hreflang > Non-200 Hreflang URLs’ export.
  • Unlinked Hreflang URLs – These are pages that contain one or more hreflang URLs that are only discoverable via its rel=”alternate” hreflang link annotations. Hreflang annotations do not pass PageRank like a traditional anchor tag, so this might be a sign of a problem with internal linking, or the URLs contained in the hreflang annotation. To find out exactly which hreflang URLs on these pages are unlinked, use the ‘Reports > Hreflang > Unlinked Hreflang URLs’ export.
  • Missing Return Links – These are URLs with missing return links (or ‘return tags’ in Google Search Console) to them, from their alternate pages. Hreflang is reciprocal, so all alternate versions must confirm the relationship. When page X links to page Y using hreflang to specify it as it’s alternate page, page Y must have a return link. No return links means the hreflang annotations may be ignored or not interpreted correctly. The missing return links URLs can be seen in the lower window ‘URL Info’ pane with a ‘missing’ confirmation status. They can be exported in bulk via the ‘Reports > Hreflang > Missing Return Links’ export.
  • Inconsistent Language & Region Return Links – This filter includes URLs with inconsistent language and regional return links to them. This is where a return link has a different language or regional value than the URL is referencing itself. The inconsistent language return URLs can be seen in the lower window ‘URL Info’ pane with an ‘Inconsistent’ confirmation status. They can be exported in bulk via the ‘Reports > Hreflang > Inconsistent Language Return Links’ export.
  • Non-Canonical Return Links – URLs with non canonical hreflang return links. Hreflang should only include canonical versions of URLs. So this filter picks up return links that go to URLs that are not the canonical versions. The non canonical return URLs can be seen in the lower window ‘URL Info’ pane with a ‘Non Canonical’ confirmation status. They can be exported in bulk via the ‘Reports > Hreflang > Non Canonical Return Links’ export.
  • Noindex Return Links – Return links which have a ‘noindex’ meta tag. All pages within a set should be indexable, and hence any return URLs with ‘noindex’ may result in the hreflang relationship being ignored. The noindex return links URLs can be seen in the lower window ‘URL Info’ pane with a ‘noindex’ confirmation status. They can be exported in bulk via the ‘Reports > Hreflang > Noindex Return Links’ export.
  • Incorrect Language & Region Codes – This simply verifies the language (in ISO 639-1 format) and optional regional (in ISO 3166-1 Alpha 2 format) code values are valid. Unsupported hreflang values can be viewed in the lower window ‘URL Info’ pane with an ‘invalid’ status.
  • Multiple Entries – URLs with multiple entries to a language or regional code. For example, if page X links to page Y and Z using the same ‘en’ hreflang value annotation. This filter will also pick up multiple implementations, for example, if hreflang annotations were discovered as link elements and via HTTP header.
  • Missing Self Reference – URLs missing their own self referencing rel=”alternate” hreflang annotation. It was previously a requirement to have a self-referencing hreflang, but Google has updated their guidelines to say this is optional. It is however good practice and often easier to include a self referencing attribute.
  • Not Using Canonical – URLs not using the canonical URL on the page, in it’s own hreflang annotation. Hreflang should only include canonical versions of URLs.
  • Missing X-Default – URLs missing an X-Default hreflang attribute. This is optional, and not necessarily an error or issue.
  • Missing – URLs missing an hreflang attribute completely. These might be valid of course, if they aren’t multiple versions of a page.
  • Outside <head> – Pages with an hreflang link element that is outside of the head element in the HTML. The hreflang link element should be within the head element, or search engines will ignore it.

Please note – The SEO Spider has a 500 hreflang annotation limit currently. If you have over this limit, they will not be reported. Over 500 hreflang annotations is unsual and might be on the extreme side for the majority of set-ups.

For more information on hreflang, please read our guide on ‘How to Audit Hreflang‘.

JavaScript

The JavaScript tab contains data and filters around common issues related to auditing websites using client-side JavaScript.

This tab will only populate in JavaScript rendering mode (‘Configuration > Spider > Rendering tab > JavaScript’).

In JavaScript rendering mode, the SEO Spider will render web pages like in a browser, and help identify JavaScript content and links and other dependencies. JavaScript rendering mode is only available in the paid version.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL address.
  • Status Code – The HTTP response code.
  • Status – The HTTP header response.
  • HTML Word Count – This is all ‘words’ inside the body tag of the raw HTML before JavaScript, excluding HTML markup. The count is based upon the content area that can be adjusted under ‘Config > Content > Area’. By default, the nav and footer elements are excluded. You can include or exclude HTML elements, classes and IDs to calculate a refined word count. Our figures may not be exactly what performing this calculation manually would find, as the parser performs certain fix-ups on invalid HTML. Your rendering settings also affect what HTML is considered. Our definition of a word is taking the text and splitting it by spaces. No consideration is given to visibility of content (such as text inside a div set to hidden).
  • Rendered HTML Word Count – This is all ‘words’ inside the body tag of the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution, excluding HTML markup. The count is based upon the content area that can be adjusted under ‘Config > Content > Area’. By default, the nav and footer elements are excluded. You can include or exclude HTML elements, classes and IDs to calculate a refined word count. Our figures may not be exactly what performing this calculation manually would find, as the parser performs certain fix-ups on invalid HTML. Your rendering settings also affect what HTML is considered. Our definition of a word is taking the text and splitting it by spaces. No consideration is given to visibility of content (such as text inside a div set to hidden).
  • Word Count Change – This is the difference between the HTML Word Count and the Rendered HTML Word Count. Essentially, how many words are populated (or removed) due to JavaScript.
  • JS Word Count % – This is the proportion of text that changes in the rendered HTML due to JavaScript.
  • HTML Title – The (first) page title discovered on the page in the raw HTML before JavaScript.
  • Rendered HTML Title – The (first) page title discovered on the page in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution.
  • HTML Meta Description – The (first) meta description discovered on the page in the raw HTML before JavaScript.
  • Rendered HTML Meta Description- The (first) meta description discovered on the page in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution.
  • HTML H1 – The (first) h1 discovered on the page in the raw HTML before JavaScript.
  • Rendered HTML H1- The (first) h1 discovered on the page in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution.
  • HTML Canonical – The canonical link element discovered on the page in the raw HTML before JavaScript.
  • Rendered HTML Canonical – The canonical link element discovered on the page in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution.
  • HTML Meta Robots – The meta robots discovered on the page in the raw HTML before JavaScript.
  • Rendered HTML Meta Robots – The meta robots discovered on the page in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution.
  • Unique Inlinks – Number of ‘unique’ internal inlinks to the URL. ‘Internal inlinks’ are links in anchor elements pointing to a given URL from the same subdomain that is being crawled. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ 3 times, this would be counted as 3 inlinks and 1 unique inlink to ‘page B’.
  • Unique JS Inlinks – Number of ‘unique’ internal inlinks to the URL that are only in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution. ‘Internal inlinks’ are links in anchor elements pointing to a given URL from the same subdomain that is being crawled. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ 3 times, this would be counted as 3 inlinks and 1 unique inlink to ‘page B’.
  • Unique Outlinks – Number of unique internal outlinks from the URL. ‘Internal outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to other URLs on the same subdomain that is being crawled. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ on the same subdomain 3 times, this would be counted as 3 outlinks and 1 unique outlink to ‘page B’.
  • Unique JS Outlinks – Number of unique internal outlinks from the URL that are only in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution. ‘Internal outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to other URLs on the same subdomain that is being crawled. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ on the same subdomain 3 times, this would be counted as 3 outlinks and 1 unique outlink to ‘page B’.
  • Unique External Outlinks – Number of unique external outlinks from the URL. ‘External outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to another subdomain. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ on a different subdomain 3 times, this would be counted as 3 external outlinks and 1 unique external outlink to ‘page B’.
  • Unique External JS Outlinks – Number of unique external outlinks from the URL that are only in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution. ‘External outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to another subdomain. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ on a different subdomain 3 times, this would be counted as 3 external outlinks and 1 unique external outlink to ‘page B’.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Pages with Blocked Resources – Pages with resources (such as images, JavaScript and CSS) that are blocked by robots.txt. This can be an issue as the search engines might not be able to access critical resources to be able to render pages accurately. Update the robots.txt to allow all critical resources to be crawled and used for rendering of the websites content. Resources that are not critical (e.g. Google Maps embed) can be ignored.
  • Contains JavaScript Links – Pages that contain hyperlinks that are only discovered in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution. These hyperlinks are not in the raw HTML. While Google is able to render pages and see client-side only links, consider including important links server side in the raw HTML.
  • Contains JavaScript Content – Pages that contain body text that’s only discovered in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution. While Google is able to render pages and see client-side only content, consider including important content server side in the raw HTML.
  • Noindex Only in Original HTML – Pages that contain a noindex in the raw HTML, and not in the rendered HTML. When Googlebot encounters a noindex tag, it skips rendering and JavaScript execution. Because Googlebot skips JavaScript execution, using JavaScript to remove the ‘noindex’ in the rendered HTML won’t work. Carefully review pages with noindex in the raw HTML are expected to not be indexed. Remove the ‘noindex’ if the pages should be indexed.
  • Nofollow Only in Original HTML – Pages that contain a nofollow in the raw HTML, and not in the rendered HTML. This means any hyperlinks in the raw HTML pre to JavaScript execution will not be followed. Carefully review pages with nofollow in the raw HTML are expected not to be followed. Remove the ‘nofollow’ if links should be followed, crawled and indexed.
  • Canonical Only in Rendered HTML – Pages that contain a canonical only in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution. Google can process canonicals in the rendered HTML, however they do not recommend relying upon JavaScript and prefer them earlier in the raw HTML. Problems with rendering, conflicting, or multiple rel=”canonical” link tags may lead to unexpected results. Include a canonical link in the raw HTML (or HTTP header) to ensure Google can see it and avoid relying only on the canonical in the rendered HTML only.
  • Canonical Mismatch – Pages that contain a different canonical link in the raw HTML to the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution. Google can process canonicals in the rendered HTML after JavaScript has been processed, however conflicting rel=”canonical” link tags may lead to unexpected results. Ensure the correct canonical is in the raw HTML and rendered HTML to avoid conflicting signals to search engines.
  • Page Title Only in Rendered HTML – Pages that contain a page title only in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution. This means a search engine must render the page to see it. While Google is able to render pages and see client-side only content, consider including important content server side in the raw HTML.
  • Page Title Updated by JavaScript – Pages that have page titles that are modified by JavaScript. This means the page title in the raw HTML is different to the page title in the rendered HTML. While Google is able to render pages and see client-side only content, consider including important content server side in the raw HTML.
  • Meta Description Only in Rendered HTML – Pages that contain a meta description only in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution. This means a search engine must render the page to see it. While Google is able to render pages and see client-side only content, consider including important content server side in the raw HTML.
  • Meta Description Updated by JavaScript – Pages that have meta descriptions that are modified by JavaScript. This means the meta description in the raw HTML is different to the meta description in the rendered HTML. While Google is able to render pages and see client-side only content, consider including important content server side in the raw HTML.
  • H1 Only in Rendered HTML – Pages that contain an h1 only in the rendered HTML after JavaScript execution. This means a search engine must render the page to see it. While Google is able to render pages and see client-side only content, consider including important content server side in the raw HTML.
  • H1 Updated by JavaScript – Pages that have h1s that are modified by JavaScript. This means the h1 in the raw HTML is different to the h1 in the rendered HTML. While Google is able to render pages and see client-side only content, consider including important content server side in the raw HTML.
  • Uses Old AJAX Crawling Scheme URLs – URLs that are still using the Old AJAX crawling scheme (a URL containing a #! hash fragment) which was officially deprecated as of October 2015. Update URLs to follow JavaScript best practices on the web today. Consider server-side rendering or pre-rendering where possible, and dynamic rendering as a workaround solution.
  • Uses Old AJAX Crawling Scheme Meta Fragment Tag – URLs include a meta fragment tag that indicates the page is still using the Old AJAX crawling scheme which was officially deprecated as of October 2015. Update URLs to follow JavaScript best practices on the web today. Consider server-side rendering or pre-rendering where possible, and dynamic rendering as a workaround solution. If the site still has the old meta fragment tag by mistake, then this should be removed.
  • Pages with JavaScript Errors – Pages with JavaScript errors captured in the Chrome DevTools console log during page rendering. While JavaScript errors are common and often have little effect on page rendering, they can be problematic – both in search engine rendering, which can hinder indexing, and for the user when interacting with the page. View console error messages in the lower ‘Chrome Console Log’ tab, view how the page is rendered in the ‘Rendered Page’ tab, and export in bulk via ‘Bulk Export > JavaScript > Pages With JavaScript Issues’.

For more information on JavaScript SEO, please read our guide on ‘How to Crawl JavaScript Websites‘.

AMP

The AMP tab includes Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) discovered during a crawl. These are identified via the HTML AMP Tag, and rel=”amphtml” inlinks. The tab includes filters for common SEO issues and validation errors using the AMP Validator.

Both ‘Store‘ and ‘Crawl‘ AMP options need to be enabled (under ‘Config > Spider’) for this tab and respective filters to be populated.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Occurrences – The number of canonicals found (via both link element and HTTP).
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if it’s canonicalised to another URL.
  • Title 1 – The (first) page title.
  • Title 1 Length – The character length of the page title.
  • Title 1 Pixel Width – The pixel width of the page title.
  • h1 – 1 – The first h1 (heading) on the page.
  • h1 – Len-1 – The character length of the h1.
  • Size – Size is in bytes, divide by 1024 to convert to kilobytes. The value is set from the Content-Length header if provided, if not it’s set to zero. For HTML pages this is updated to the size of the (uncompressed) HTML in bytes.
  • Word Count – This is all ‘words’ inside the body tag. This does not include HTML markup. Our figures may not be exactly what doing this manually would find, as the parser performs certain fix-ups on invalid html. Your rendering settings also affect what HTML is considered. Our definition of a word is taking the text and splitting it by spaces. No consideration is given to visibility of content (such as text inside a div set to hidden).
  • Text Ratio – Number of non-HTML characters found in the HTML body tag on a page (the text), divided by the total number of characters the HTML page is made up of, and displayed as a percentage.
  • Crawl Depth – Depth of the page from the start page (number of ‘clicks’ away from the start page). Please note, redirects are counted as a level currently in our page depth calculations.
  • Response Time – Time in seconds to download the URI. More detailed information in can be found in our FAQ.

SEO Related Filters

This tab includes the following SEO related filters.

  • Non-200 Response – The AMP URLs do not respond with a 200 ‘OK’ status code. These will include URLs blocked by robots.txt, no responses, redirects, client and server errors.
  • Missing Non-AMP Return Link – The canonical non-AMP version of the URL, does not contain a rel=”amphtml” URL back to the AMP URL. This could simply be missing from the non-AMP version, or there might be a configuration issue with the AMP canonical.
  • Missing Canonical to Non-AMP – The AMP URLs canonical does not go to a non-AMP version, but to another AMP URL.
  • Non-Indexable Canonical – The AMP canonical URL is a non-indexable page. Generally the desktop equivalent should be an indexable page.
  • Indexable – The AMP URL is indexable. AMP URLs with a desktop equivalent should be non-indexable (as they should have a canonical to the desktop equivalent). Standalone AMP URLs (without an equivalent) should be indexable.
  • Non-Indexable – The AMP URL is non-indexable. This is usually because they are correctly canonicalised to the desktop equivalent.

The following filters help identify common issues relating to AMP specifications. The SEO Spider uses the official AMP Validator for validation of AMP URLs.


AMP Related Filters

This tab includes the following AMP specific filters.

  • Missing HTML AMP Tag – AMP HTML documents must contain a top-level HTML or HTML AMP tag.
  • Missing/Invalid Doctype HTML Tag – AMP HTML documents must start with the doctype, doctype HTML.
  • Missing Head Tag – AMP HTML documents must contain head tags (they are optional in HTML).
  • Missing Body Tag – AMP HTML documents must contain body tags (they are optional in HTML).
  • Missing Canonical – AMP URLs must contain a canonical tag inside their head that points to the regular HTML version of the AMP HTML document, or to itself if no such HTML version exists.
  • Missing/Invalid Meta Charset Tag – AMP HTML documents must contain a meta charset=”utf-8″ tag as the first child of their head tag.
  • Missing/Invalid Meta Viewport Tag – AMP HTML documents must contain a meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width,minimum-scale=1″ tag inside their head tag. It’s also recommended to include initial-scale=1.
  • Missing/Invalid AMP Script – AMP HTML documents must contain a script async src=”https://cdn.ampproject.org/v0.js” tag inside their head tag.
  • Missing/Invalid AMP Boilerplate – AMP HTML documents must contain the AMP boilerplate code in their head tag.
  • Contains Disallowed HTML – This flags any AMP URLs with disallowed HTML for AMP.
  • Other Validation Errors – This flags any AMP URLs with other validation errors not already covered by the above filters.

For more information on AMP, please read our guide on ‘How to Audit & Validate AMP‘.

Structured data

The Structured Data tab includes details of structured data and validation issues discovered from a crawl.

‘JSON-LD’, ‘Microdata’, ‘RDFa’, ‘Schema.org Validation’ and ‘Google Rich Result Feature Validation’ configuration options need to be enabled (under ‘Config > Spider > Extraction’) for this tab and respective filters to be fully populated.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Errors – The total number of validation errors discovered for the URL.
  • Warnings – The total number of validation warnings discovered for the URL.
  • Total Types – The total number of itemtypes discovered for the URL.
  • Unique Types – The unique number of itemtypes discovered for the URL.
  • Type 1 – The first itemtype discovered for the URL.
  • Type 2 etc – The second itemtype discovered for the URL.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Contains Structured Data – These are simply any URLs that contain structured data. You can see the different types in columns in the upper window.
  • Missing Structured Data – These are URLs that do not contain any structured data.
  • Validation Errors – These are URLs that contain validation errors. The errors can be either Schema.org, Google rich result features, or both – depending on your configuration. Schema.org issues will always be classed as errors, rather than warnings. Google rich result feature validation will show errors for missing required properties or problems with the implementation of required properties. Google’s ‘required properties’ must be included and be valid for content to be eligible for display as a rich result.
  • Validation Warnings – These are URLs that contain validation warnings for Google rich result features. These will always be for ‘recommended properties’, rather than required properties. Recommended properties can be included to add more information about content, which could provide a better user experience – but they are not essential to be eligible for rich snippets and hence why they are only a warning. There are no ‘warnings’ for Schema.org validation issues, however there is a warning for using the older data-vocabulary.org schema.
  • Parse Errors – These are URLs which have structured data that failed to parse correctly. This is often due to incorrect mark-up. If you’re using Google’s preferred format JSON-LD, then the JSON-LD Playground is an excellent tool to help debug parsing errors.
  • Microdata URLs – These are URLs that contain structured data in microdata format.
  • JSON-LD URLs – These are URLs that contain structured data in JSON-LD format.
  • RDFa URLs – These are URLs that contain structured data in RDFa format.

Structured Data & Google Rich Snippet Feature Validation

Structured Data validation includes checks against whether the types and properties exist according to Schema.org and will show ‘errors’ for any issues encountered.

For example, it checks to see whether https://schema.org/author exists for a property, or https://schema.org/Book exist as a type. It validates against main and pending Schema vocabulary from Schema.org latest version.

There might be a short time between a Schema.org vocabulary release, and it being updated in the SEO Spider.

The SEO Spider also performs validation against Google rich result features to check the presence of required and recommended properties and their values are accurate.

The full list of that the SEO Spider is able to validate against includes –

The list of Google rich result features that the SEO Spider doesn’t currently validate against is –

  • We currently support all Google features.

For more information on structured data validation, please read our guide on ‘How To Test & Validate Structured Data‘.

Sitemaps

The Sitemaps tab shows all URLs discovered in a crawl, which can then be filtered to show additional information related to XML Sitemaps.

To crawl XML Sitemaps in a regular crawl and for the filters to be populated, the ‘Crawl Linked XML Sitemaps‘ configuration needs to be enabled (under ‘Configuration > Spider’).

A ‘Crawl Analysis‘ will also need to be performed at the end of the crawl to populate some of the filters.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Content – The content type of the URI.
  • Status Code – HTTP response code.
  • Status – The HTTP header response.
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if it’s canonicalised to another URL.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • URLs In Sitemap – All URLs that are in an XML Sitemap. This should contain indexable and canonical versions of important URLs.
  • URLs Not In Sitemap – URLs that are not in an XML Sitemap, but were discovered in the crawl. This might be on purpose (as they are not important), or they might be missing, and the XML Sitemap needs to be updated to include them. This filter does not consider non-indexable URLs, it assumes they are correctly non-indexable, and therefore shouldn’t be flagged to be included.
  • Orphan URLs – URLs that are only in an XML Sitemap, but were not discovered during the crawl. Or, URLs that are only discovered from URLs in the XML Sitemap, but were not found in the crawl. These might be accidentally included in the XML Sitemap, or they might be pages that you wish to be indexed, and should really be linked to internally.
  • Non-Indexable URLs in Sitemap – URLs that are in an XML Sitemap, but are non-indexable, and hence should be removed, or their indexability needs to be fixed.
  • URLs In Multiple Sitemaps – URLs that are in more than one XML Sitemap. This isn’t necessarily a problem, but generally a URL only needs to be in a single XML Sitemap.
  • XML Sitemap With Over 50k URLs – This shows any XML Sitemap that has more than the permitted 50k URLs. If you have more URLs, you will have to break your list into multiple sitemaps and create a sitemap index file which lists them all.
  • XML Sitemap With Over 50mb – This shows any XML Sitemap that is larger than the permitted 50mb file size. If the sitemap is over the 50MB (uncompressed) limit, you will have to break your list into multiple sitemaps.

For more information on XML Sitemaps, please read our guide on ‘How to Audit XML Sitemaps‘, as well as Sitemaps.org and Google Search Console help.

PageSpeed

The PageSpeed tab includes data from PageSpeed Insights which uses Lighthouse for ‘lab data’ speed auditing, and is able to look up real-world data from the Chrome User Experience Report (CrUX, or ‘field data’).

To pull in PageSpeed data simply go to ‘Configuration > API Access > PageSpeed Insights’, insert a free PageSpeed API key, connect and run a crawl. Data will then start to be populated against crawled URLs.

Please read our PageSpeed Insights integration guide on how to set up a free API and configure the SEO Spider.


Columns & Metrics

The following speed metrics, opportunities and diagnostics data can be configured to be collected via the PageSpeed Insights API integration.

Overview Metrics

  • Total Size Savings
  • Total Time Savings
  • Total Requests
  • Total Page Size
  • HTML Size
  • HTML Count
  • Image Size
  • Image Count
  • CSS Size
  • CSS Count
  • JavaScript Size
  • JavaScript Count
  • Font Size
  • Font Count
  • Media Size
  • Media Count
  • Other Size
  • Other Count
  • Third Party Size
  • Third Party Count

CrUX Metrics (‘Field Data’ in PageSpeed Insights)

  • Core Web Vitals Assessment
  • CrUX First Contentful Paint Time (sec)
  • CrUX First Contentful Paint Category
  • CrUX First Input Delay Time (sec)
  • CrUX First Input Delay Category
  • CrUX Largest Contentful Paint Time (sec)
  • CrUX Largest Contentful Paint Category
  • CrUX Cumulative Layout Shift
  • CrUX Cumulative Layout Shift Category
  • CrUX Interaction to Next Paint (ms)
  • CrUX Interaction to Next Paint Category
  • CrUX Time to First Byte (ms)
  • CrUX Time to First Byte Category
  • CrUX Origin Core Web Vitals Assessment
  • CrUX Origin First Contentful Paint Time (sec)
  • CrUX Origin First Contentful Paint Category
  • CrUX Origin First Input Delay Time (sec)
  • CrUX Origin First Input Delay Category
  • CrUX Origin Largest Contentful Paint Time (sec)
  • CrUX Origin Largest Contentful Paint Category
  • CrUX Origin Cumulative Layout Shift
  • CrUX Origin Cumulative Layout Shift Category
  • CrUX Origin Interaction to Next Paint (ms)
  • CrUX Origin Interaction to Next Paint Category
  • CrUX Origin Time to First Byte (ms)
  • CrUX Origin Time to First Byte Category

Lighthouse Metrics (‘Lab Data’ in PageSpeed Insights)

  • Performance Score
  • Time to First Byte (ms)
  • First Contentful Paint Time (sec)
  • First Contentful Paint Score
  • Speed Index Time (sec)
  • Speed Index Score
  • Largest Contentful Paint Time (sec)
  • Largest Contentful Paint Score
  • Time to Interactive (sec)
  • Time to Interactive Score
  • First Meaningful Paint Time (sec)
  • First Meaningful Paint Score
  • Max Potential First Input Delay (ms)
  • Max Potential First Input Delay Score
  • Total Blocking Time (ms)
  • Total Blocking Time Score
  • Cumulative Layout Shift
  • Cumulative Layout Shift Score

Opportunities

  • Eliminate Render-Blocking Resources Savings (ms)
  • Defer Offscreen Images Savings (ms)
  • Defer Offscreen Images Savings
  • Efficiently Encode Images Savings (ms)
  • Efficiently Encode Images Savings
  • Properly Size Images Savings (ms)
  • Properly Size Images Savings
  • Minify CSS Savings (ms)
  • Minify CSS Savings
  • Minify JavaScript Savings (ms)
  • Minify JavaScript Savings
  • Reduce Unused CSS Savings (ms)
  • Reduce Unused CSS Savings
  • Reduce Unused JavaScript Savings (ms)
  • Reduce Unused JavaScript Savings
  • Serve Images in Next-Gen Formats Savings (ms)
  • Serve Images in Next-Gen Formats Savings
  • Enable Text Compression Savings (ms)
  • Enable Text Compression Savings
  • Preconnect to Required Origin Savings
  • Server Response Times (TTFB) (ms)
  • Server Response Times (TTFB) Category (ms)
  • Multiple Redirects Savings (ms)
  • Preload Key Requests Savings (ms)
  • Use Video Format for Animated Images Savings (ms)
  • Use Video Format for Animated Images Savings
  • Total Image Optimization Savings (ms)
  • Avoid Serving Legacy JavaScript to Modern Browser Savings

Diagnostics

  • DOM Element Count
  • JavaScript Execution Time (sec)
  • JavaScript Execution Time Category
  • Efficient Cache Policy Savings
  • Minimize Main-Thread Work (sec)
  • Minimize Main-Thread Work Category
  • Text Remains Visible During Webfont Load
  • Image Elements Do Not Have Explicit Width & Height
  • Avoid Large Layout Shifts

You can read more about the definition of each metric, opportunity or diagnostic according to Lighthouse.


Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Eliminate Render-Blocking Resources – This highlights all pages with resources that are blocking the first paint of the page, along with the potential savings.
  • Properly Size Images – This highlights all pages with images that are not properly sized, along with the potential savings when they are resized appropriately.
  • Defer Offscreen Images – This highlights all pages with images that are hidden or offscreen, along with the potential savings if they were lazy-loaded.
  • Minify CSS – This highlights all pages with unminified CSS files, along with the potential savings when they are correctly minified.
  • Minify JavaScript – This highlights all pages with unminified JavaScript files, along with the potential savings when they are correctly minified.
  • Reduce Unused CSS – This highlights all pages with unused CSS, along with the potential savings when they are removed of unnecessary bytes.
  • Reduce Unused JavaScript – This highlights all pages with unused JavaScript, along with the potential savings when they are removed of unnecessary bytes.
  • Efficiently Encode Images – This highlights all pages with unoptimised images, along with the potential savings.
  • Serve Images in Next-Gen Formats – This highlights all pages with images that are in older image formats, along with the potential savings.
  • Enable Text Compression – This highlights all pages with text based resources that are not compressed, along with the potential savings.
  • Preconnect to Required Origin – This highlights all pages with key requests that aren’t yet prioritizing fetch requests with link rel=preconnect, along with the potential savings.
  • Reduce Server Response Times (TTFB) – This highlights all pages where the browser has had to wait for over 600ms for the server to respond to the main document request.
  • Avoid Multiple Page Redirects – This highlights all pages which have resources that redirect, and the potential saving by using the direct URL.
  • Preload Key Requests – This highlights all pages with resources that are third level of requests in your critical request chain as preload candidates.
  • Use Video Format for Animated Images – This highlights all pages with animated GIFs, along with the potential savings of converting them into videos.
  • Avoid Excessive DOM Size – This highlights all pages with a large DOM size over the recommended 1,500 total nodes.
  • Reduce JavaScript Execution Time – This highlights all pages with average or slow JavaScript execution time.
  • Serve Static Assets With An Efficient Cache Policy – This highlights all pages with resources that are not cached, along with the potential savings.
  • Minimize Main-Thread Work – This highlights all pages with average or slow execution timing on the main thread.
  • Ensure Text Remains Visible During Webfont Load – This highlights all pages with fonts that may flash or become invisible during page load.
  • Image Elements Do Not Have Explicit Width & Height – This highlights all pages that have images without dimensions (width and height size attributes) specified in the HTML. This can be a big cause of poor CLS.
  • Avoid Large Layout Shifts – This highlights all pages that have DOM elements contributing most to the CLS of the page and provides a contribution score of each to help prioritise.
  • Avoid Serving Legacy JavaScript to Modern Browsers – This highlights all pages with legacy JavaScript. Polyfills and transforms enable legacy browsers to use new JavaScript features. However, many aren’t necessary for modern browsers. For your bundled JavaScript, adopt a modern script deployment strategy using module/nomodule feature detection to reduce the amount of code shipped to modern browsers, while retaining support for legacy browsers.

Please read the Lighthouse performance audits guide for more definitions and explanations of each of the opportunities and diagnostics above.

The speed opportunities, source pages and resource URLs that have potential savings can be exported in bulk via the ‘Reports > PageSpeed’ menu.

PageSpeed reporting

The ‘CSS Coverage Summary’ report highlights how much of each CSS file is unused across a crawl, and the potential savings that could be made by removing unused code that is loading across the site.

The ‘JavaScript Coverage Summary’ report highlights how much of each JS file is unused across a crawl, and the potential savings that could be made by removing unused code that is loading across the site.


PageSpeed Insights API Status & Errors

The PSI Status column shows whether an API request for a URL has been a ‘success’ and shows data, or there has been an error and no data is displayed. An ‘error’ usually reflects the web interface, where you would see the same error and message.

The ‘PSI Error’ column displays the full message received from the PSI API to provide more information about the cause. Some errors are due to the Lighthouse audit itself failing, other errors can be due to the PSI API being unavailable when the request is made.

Please read our FAQ on PageSpeed Insights API Errors for more information.

Mobile

The Mobile tab includes data from Lighthouse via the PageSpeed Insights API, or running Lighthouse locally.

To audit mobile usability issues, then PSI must be connected via ‘Configuration > API Access > PageSpeed Insights’ and ‘Mobile Friendly’ metrics selected under the ‘Metrics’ tab.

The ‘Source’ can be set as either ‘Remote’ or ‘Local’. Remote means the data is collected via the PageSpeed Insights API, which requires a free PageSpeed API key. If ‘Local’ is selected, then Lighthouse will be run locally on the machine in headless Chrome.

With either option selected and PSI connected, data will then start to be populated against crawled URLs.

Please read our PageSpeed Insights integration guide on how to set up a free API and configure the SEO Spider.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • PSI Status – Either a ‘success’ retrieving data, or an ‘error’.
  • PSI Error – If there is an error, the error response.
  • Viewport – The Lighthouse performance score out of 100 for this audit.
  • Tap Targets – The Lighthouse performance score out of 100 for this audit.
  • Content Width – The Lighthouse performance score out of 100 for this audit.
  • Font Display – The Lighthouse performance score out of 100 for this audit.
  • Plugins – The Lighthouse performance score out of 100 for this audit.
  • Mobile Alternate Link – Any desktop URLs that contain a rel=”alternate” link element to a mobile version.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Viewport Not Set – Pages without a viewport meta tag, or a viewport meta tag without a content attribute that includes the text width=. Setting the viewport meta tag allows the width and scaling to be sized correctly on all devices. Without this set, mobile devices will render pages at desktop screen widths and scale them down, making the text difficult to read.
  • Target Size – Pages with tap targets that are too small or there is not enough space around them, which means they are difficult to interact with on mobile devices. Tap targets (also known as ‘touch targets’) are buttons, links or form elements that users on touch devices can use. Insufficient size or spacing can also make it challenging for users with mobility impairments, or anyone experiencing difficulties controlling fine movement. Tap targets must be at least 24 by 24 CSS pixels in size.
  • Content Not Sized Correctly – Pages with content that is smaller or larger than the viewport width, which means it may not render correctly on mobile devices. Lighthouse flags pages whose width isn’t equal to the width of the viewport.
  • Illegible Font Size – Pages with small font sizes that can make it difficult to read for users on mobile devices. Lighthouse will flag pages that have font sizes smaller than 12px, which make up more than 40% of the page text.
  • Unsupported Plugins – Pages with browser plugins such as Flash, Silverlight, or Java Applets that most mobile devices and browsers do not support and search engines cannot index.
  • Mobile Alternate Link – Pages that contain a rel=”alternate” link element to a mobile version. While this is an acceptable set up, it means serving different HTML to each device on separate URLs. This can often be less efficient than a responsive design approach.

Bulk exports of mobile issues including granular details from Lighthouse are available under the ‘Reports’ menu


PageSpeed Insights API Status & Errors

The PSI Status column shows whether an API request for a URL has been a ‘success’ and shows data, or there has been an error and no data is displayed. An ‘error’ usually reflects the web interface, where you would see the same error and message.

The ‘PSI Error’ column displays the full message received from the PSI API to provide more information about the cause. Some errors are due to the Lighthouse audit itself failing, other errors can be due to the PSI API being unavailable when the request is made.

Please read our FAQ on PageSpeed Insights API Errors for more information.

Custom search

The custom search tab works alongside the custom search configuration. The custom search feature allows you to search the source code of HTML pages and can be configured by clicking ‘Config > Custom > Search’.

You’re able to configure up to 100 search filters in the custom search configuration, which allow you to input your regex and find pages that either ‘contain’ or ‘does not contain’ your chosen input. The results appear within the custom search tab as outlined below.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URI crawled.
  • Content – The content type of the URI.
  • Status Code – HTTP response code.
  • Status – The HTTP header response.
  • Contains: [x] – The number of times [x] appears within the source code of the URL. [x] is the query string that has been entered in the custom search configuration.
  • Does Not Contain: [y] – The column will either return ‘Contains’ or ‘Does Not Contain’ [y]. [y] is the query string that has been entered in the custom search configuration.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • [Search Filter Name] – Filters are dynamic, and will match the name of the custom configuration and relevant column. They show URLs that either contain or do not contain the query string entered.

Custom extraction

The custom extraction tab works alongside the custom extraction configuration. This feature allows you to scrape any data from the HTML of pages in a crawl and can be configured under ‘Config > Custom > Extraction’.

You’re able to configure up to 100 extractors in the custom extraction configuration, which allow you to input XPath, CSSPath or regex to scrape the required data. Extraction is performed against URLs with an HTML content type only.

The results appear within the custom extraction tab as outlined below.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URI crawled.
  • Content – The content type of the URI.
  • Status Code – HTTP response code.
  • Status – The HTTP header response.
  • [Extractor Name] – Column heading names are dynamic based upon the name provided to each extractor. Each extractor will have a seperate named column, which will contain the data extracted against each URL.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • [Extractor Name] – Filters are dynamic, and will match the name of the extractors and relevant column. They show the relevant extraction column against the URLs.

Custom JavaScript

The custom JavaScript tab works alongside the custom JavaScript configuration. This feature allows you to exectute custom JS snippets to perform actions or extract data while crawling and can be configured under ‘Config > Custom > Custom JavaScript’.

You’re able to configure up to 100 JS Snippets in the custom JavaScript configuration. Custom JS snippets are run against internal URLs only.

The results appear within the custom JavaScript tab as outlined below.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL crawled.
  • Content Type – The content type of the URL.
  • Status Code – HTTP response code.
  • Status – The HTTP header response.
  • [Snippet Name] – Column heading names are dynamic based upon the name provided to each snippet. Each snippet will have a seperate named column, which will contain the data extracted against each URL.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • [Snippet Name] – Filters are dynamic, and will match the name of the snippets and relevant column. They show the relevant snippet column against the URLs.

Please note: Only snippets set up as an ‘Extraction’ type will appear in the custom JavaScript tab and have a filter, or column. ‘Action’ snippets perform an action, rather than extract data, and therefore will not appear.

Analytics

The Analytics tab includes data from Google Analytics when the SEO Spider is integrated with Google Analytics under ‘Configuration > API Access > Google Analytics’. Please read our Google Analytics integration guide for more details.

The SEO Spider currently allows you to select up to 30 metrics at a time, however by default it will collect the following 10 Google Analytics metrics.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Sessions
  • % New Sessions
  • New Users
  • Bounce Rate
  • Page Views Per Session
  • Avg Session Duration
  • Page Value
  • Goal Conversion Rate
  • Goal Completions All
  • Goal Value All

You can read more about the definition of each metric from Google.

Please read our Google Analytics integration user guide for more information about configuring your account, property, view, segment, date range, metrics and dimensions.


Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Sessions Above 0 – This simply means the URL in question has 1 or more sessions.
  • Bounce Rate Above 70% – This means the URL has a bounce rate over 70%, which you may wish to investigate. In some scenarios this is normal, though!
  • No GA Data – This means that for the metrics and dimensions queried, the Google API didn’t return any data for the URLs in the crawl. So the URLs either didn’t receive any sessions, or perhaps the URLs in the crawl are just different to those in GA for some reason.
  • Non-Indexable with GA Data – URLs that are classed as non-indexable, but have Google Analytics data.
  • Orphan URLs – URLs that have been discovered via Google Analytics, rather than internal links during a crawl. This filter requires ‘Crawl New URLs Discovered In Google Analytics’ to be enabled under the ‘General’ tab of the Google Analytics configuration window (Configuration > API Access > Google Analytics) and post ‘crawl analysis‘ to be populated. Please see our guide on how to find orphan pages.

Search Console

The Search Console tab includes data from the Search Analyitcs and URL Inspection APIs when the SEO Spider is integrated with Google Search Console under ‘Configuration > API Access > Google Search Console’.

Please read our Google Search Console integration guide for more details. When integrated, the following data is collected.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns from Search Analytics by default.

  • Clicks
  • Impressions
  • CTR
  • Position

You can read more about the definition of each metric from Google.

Optionally, you can choose to ‘Enable URL Inspection’ alongside Search Analytics data, which provides Google index status data for up to 2,000 URLs per property a day. This includes the following columns for the URL Inspection API.

  • Summary – A top level verdict on whether the URL is indexed and eligible to display in the Google search results. ‘URL is on Google’ means the URL has been indexed, can appear in Google Search results, and no problems were found with any enhancements found in the page (rich results, mobile, AMP). ‘URL is on Google, but has Issues’ means it has been indexed and can appear in Google Search results, but there are some problems with mobile usability, AMP or Rich results that might mean it doesn’t appear in an optimal way. ‘URL is not on Google’ means it is not indexed by Google and won’t appear in the search results. This filter can include non-indexable URLs (such as those that are ‘noindex’) as well as Indexable URLs that are able to be indexed.
  • Coverage – A short, descriptive reason for the status of the URL, explaining why the URL is or isn’t on Google.
  • Last Crawl – The last time this page was crawled by Google, in your local time. All information shown in this tool is derived from this last crawled version.
  • Crawled As – The user agent type used for the crawl (desktop or mobile).
  • Crawl Allowed – Indicates whether your site allowed Google to crawl (visit) the page or blocked it with a robots.txt rule.
  • Page Fetch – Whether or not Google could actually get the page from your server. If crawling is not allowed, this field will show a failure.
  • Indexing Allowed – Whether or not your page explicitly disallowed indexing. If indexing is disallowed, the reason is explained, and the page won’t appear in Google Search results.
  • User-Declared Canonical – If your page explicitly declares a canonical URL, it will be shown here.
  • Google-Selected Canonical – The page that Google selected as the canonical (authoritative) URL, when it found similar or duplicate pages on your site.
  • Mobile Usability – Whether the page is mobile friendly or not.
  • Mobile Usability Issues – If the ‘page is not mobile friendly’, this column will display a list of mobile usability errors.
  • AMP Results – A verdict on whether the AMP URL is valid, invalid or has warnings. ‘Valid’ means the AMP URL is valid and indexed. ‘Invalid’ means the AMP URL has an error that will prevent it from being indexed. ‘Valid with warnings’ means the AMP URL can be indexed, but there are some issues that might prevent it from getting full features, or it uses tags or attributes that are deprecated, and might become invalid in the future.
  • AMP Issues – If the URL has AMP issues, this column will display a list of AMP errors.
  • Rich Results – A verdict on whether Rich results found on the page are valid, invalid or has warnings. ‘Valid’ means rich results have been found and are eligible for search. ‘Invalid’ means one or more rich results on the page has an error that will prevent it from being eligible for search. ‘Valid with warnings’ means the rich results on the page are eligible for search, but there are some issues that might prevent it from getting full features.
  • Rich Results Types – A comma separated list of all rich result enhancements discovered on the page.
  • Rich Results Types Errors – A comma separated list of all rich result enhancements discovered with an error on the page. To export specific errors discovered, use the ‘Bulk Export > URL Inspection > Rich Results’ export.
  • Rich Results Warnings – A comma separated list of all rich result enhancements discovered with a warning on the page. To export specific warnings discovered, use the ‘Bulk Export > URL Inspection > Rich Results’ export.

You can read more about the the indexed URL results from Google.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Clicks Above 0 – This simply means the URL in question has 1 or more clicks.
  • No Search Analytics Data – This means that the Search Analytics API didn’t return any data for the URLs in the crawl. So the URLs either didn’t receive any impressions, or perhaps the URLs in the crawl are just different to those in GSC for some reason.
  • Non-Indexable with Search Analytics Data – URLs that are classed as non-indexable, but have Google Search Analytics data.
  • Orphan URLs – URLs that have been discovered via Google Search Analytics, rather than internal links during a crawl. This filter requires ‘Crawl New URLs Discovered In Google Search Console’ to be enabled in the ‘Search Analytics’ tab of the Google Search Console configuration (‘Configuration > API Access > Google Search Console > Search Analytics ‘) and post ‘crawl analysis‘ to be populated. Please see our guide on how to find orphan pages.
  • URL Is Not on Google – The URL is not indexed by Google and won’t appear in the search results. This filter can include non-indexable URLs (such as those that are ‘noindex’) as well as Indexable URLs that are able to be indexed. It’s a catch all filter for anything not on Google according to the API.
  • Indexable URL Not Indexed – Indexable URLs found in the crawl that are not indexed by Google and won’t appear in the search results. This can include URLs that are unknown to Google, or those that have been discovered but not indexed, and more.
  • URL is on Google, But Has Issues – The URL has been indexed and can appear in Google Search results, but there are some problems with mobile usability, AMP or Rich results that might mean it doesn’t appear in an optimal way.
  • User-Declared Canonical Not Selected – Google has chosen to index a different URL to the one declared by the user in the HTML. Canonicals are hints, and sometimes Google does a great job of this, other times it’s less than ideal.
  • Page Is Not Mobile Friendly – The page has issues on mobile devices.
  • AMP URL Is Invalid – The AMP has an error that will prevent it from being indexed.
  • Rich Result Invalid – The URL has an error with one or more rich result enhancements that will prevent the rich result from showing in the Google search results. To export specific errors discovered, use the ‘Bulk Export > URL Inspection > Rich Results’ export.

For more on using the URL Inspection API, please read our guide on ‘How To Automate the URL Inspection API‘.

Validation

The validation tab performs some basic best practice validations that can impact crawlers when crawling and indexing. This isn’t W3C HTML validation which is a little too strict, the aim of this tab is to identify issues that can impact search bots from being able to parse and understand a page reliably.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns.

  • Address – The URL address.
  • Content – The content type of the URL.
  • Status Code – The HTTP response code.
  • Status – The HTTP header response.
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is Indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Indexability Status – The reason why a URL is Non-Indexable. For example, if it’s canonicalised to another URL.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Invalid HTML Elements In <head> – Pages with invalid HTML elements within the <head>. When an invalid element is used in the <head>, Google assumes the end of the <head> element and ignores any elements that appear after the invalid element. This means critical <head> elements that appear after the invalid element will not be seen. The <head> element as per the HTML standard is reserved for title, meta, link, script, style, base, noscript and template elements only.
  • <body> Element Preceding <html> – Pages that have a body element preceding the opening html element. Browsers and Googlebot will automatically assume the start of the body and generate an empty head element before it. This means the intended head element below and its metadata will be seen in the body and ignored.
  • <head> Not First In <html> Element – Pages with an HTML element that proceed the <head> element in the HTML. The <head> should be the first element in the <html> element. Browsers and Googlebot will automatically generate a <head> element if it’s not first in the HTML. While ideally <head> elements would be in the <head>, if a valid <head> element is first in the <html> it will be considered as part of the generated <head>. However, if non <head> elements such as <p>, <body>, <img> etc are used before the intended <head> element and its metadata, then Google assumes the end of the <head> element. This means the intended <head> element and its metadata may only be seen in the <body> and ignored.
  • Missing <head> Tag – Pages missing a <head> element within the HTML. The <head> element is a container for metadata about the page, that’s placed between the <html> and <body> tag. Metadata is used to define the page title, character set, styles, scripts, viewport and other data that are critical to the page. Browsers and Googlebot will automatically generate a <head> element if it’s omitted in the markup, however it may not contain meaningful metadata for the page and this should not be relied upon.
  • Multiple <head> Tags – Pages with multiple <head> elements in the HTML. There should only be one <head> element in the HTML which contains all critical metadata for the document. Browsers and Googlebot will combine metadata from subsequent <head> elements if they are both before the <body>, however, this should not be relied upon and is open to potential mix-ups. Any <head> tags after the <body> starts will be ignored.
  • Missing <body> Tag – Pages missing a <body> element within the HTML. The <body> element contains all the content of a page, including links, headings, paragraphs, images and more. There should be one <body> element in the HTML of the page. Browsers and Googlebot will automatically generate a <body> element if it’s omitted in the markup, however, this should not be relied upon.
  • Multiple <body> Tags – Pages with multiple <body> elements in the HTML. There should only be one <body> element in the HTML which contains all content for the document. Browsers and Googlebot will try to combine content from subsequent <body> elements, however, this should not be relied upon and is open to potential mix-ups.
  • HTML Document Over 15MB – Pages which are over 15MB in document size. This is important as Googlebot limit their crawling and indexing to the first 15MB of an HTML file or supported text-based file. This size does not include resources referenced in the HTML such as images, videos, CSS, and JavaScript that are fetched separately. Google only considers the first 15MB of the file for indexing and stops crawling afterwards. The file size limit is applied on the uncompressed data. The median size of an HTML file is about 30 kilobytes (KB), so pages are highly unlikely to reach this limit.

For more on Invalid HTML Elements In <head>, please read our guide on ‘How To Debug Invalid HTML Elements In The Head‘.

Change Detection

The Change Detection tab contains data and filters around changes between current and previous crawls.

This tab will only be available if you are in ‘Compare’ mode when performing a crawl comparison.

In ‘Compare’ mode, click on the compare configuration via ‘Config > Compare’ (or the ‘cog’ icon at the top) and select the elements and metrics you want to identify changes in.

Once the crawl comparison has been run, the ‘Change Detection’ tab will appear in the master view and in the Overview tab, containing filters for any elements and metrics selected with details of changes discovered.


Columns

This tab includes the following columns for current and previous crawls.

  • Address – The URL address.
  • Indexability – Whether the URL is Indexable or Non-Indexable.
  • Title 1 – The (first) page title discovered on the page.
  • Meta Description 1 – The (first) meta description on the page.
  • h1 – 1 – The first h1 (heading) on the page.
  • Word Count – This is all ‘words’ inside the body tag, excluding HTML markup. The count is based upon the content area that can be adjusted under ‘Config > Content > Area’. By default, the nav and footer elements are excluded. You can include or exclude HTML elements, classes and IDs to calculate a refined word count. Our figures may not be exactly what performing this calculation manually would find, as the parser performs certain fix-ups on invalid HTML. Your rendering settings also affect what HTML is considered. Our definition of a word is taking the text and splitting it by spaces. No consideration is given to visibility of content (such as text inside a div set to hidden).
  • Crawl Depth – Depth of the page from the start page (number of ‘clicks’ away from the start page). Please note, redirects are counted as a level currently in our page depth calculations.
  • Inlinks – Number of internal hyperlinks to the URL. ‘Internal inlinks’ are links in anchor elements pointing to a given URL from the same subdomain that is being crawled.
  • Unique Inlinks – Number of ‘unique’ internal inlinks to the URL. ‘Internal inlinks’ are links in anchor elements pointing to a given URL from the same subdomain that is being crawled. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ 3 times, this would be counted as 3 inlinks and 1 unique inlink to ‘page B’.
  • Outlinks – Number of internal outlinks from the URL. ‘Internal outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to other URLs on the same subdomain that is being crawled.
  • Unique Outlinks – Number of unique internal outlinks from the URL. ‘Internal outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to other URLs on the same subdomain that is being crawled. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ on the same subdomain 3 times, this would be counted as 3 outlinks and 1 unique outlink to ‘page B’.
  • External Outlinks – Number of external outlinks from the URL. ‘External outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to another subdomain.
  • Unique External Outlinks – Number of unique external outlinks from the URL. ‘External outlinks’ are links in anchor elements from a given URL to another subdomain. For example, if ‘page A’ links to ‘page B’ on a different subdomain 3 times, this would be counted as 3 external outlinks and 1 unique external outlink to ‘page B’.
  • Unique Types – The unique number of structured data itemtypes discovered for the URL.

Filters

This tab includes the following filters.

  • Indexability – Pages that have changed indexability (Indexable or Non-Indexable).
  • Page Titles – Pages that have changed page title elements.
  • Meta Description – Pages that have changed meta descriptions.
  • H1 – Pages that have changed h1.
  • Word Count – Pages that have changed word count.
  • Crawl Depth – Pages that have changed crawl depth.
  • Inlinks – Pages that have changed inlinks.
  • Unique Inlinks – Pages that have changed unique inlinks.
  • Internal Outlinks – Pages that have changed internal outlinks.
  • Unique Internal Outlinks – Pages that have changed unique internal outlinks.
  • External Outlinks – Pages that have changed external outlinks.
  • Unique External Outlinks – Pages that have changed unique external outlinks.
  • Structured Data Unique Types – Pages that have changed unique number of structured data itemtypes discovered.
  • Content – Pages where the content has changed by more than 10% (or the configured similarity change under ‘Config > Compare’).

For more information on Change Detection, please read our tutorial on ‘How To Compare Crawls‘.

URL details

If you highlight a URL in the top window, this bottom window tab populates. This contains an overview of the URL in question. This is a selection of data from the columns reported in the upper window Internal tab including:

  • URL – The URL crawled.
  • Status Code – HTTP response code.
  • Status – The HTTP header response.
  • Content – The content type of the URL.
  • Size – File or web page size.
  • Crawl Depth – Depth of the page from the homepage or start page (number of ‘clicks’ aways from the start page).
  • Inlinks – Number of internal inlinks to the URL.
  • Outlinks – Number of internal outlinks from the URL.

Image details

If you highlight a page URL in the top window, the bottom window tab is populated with a list of images found on the page.

If you highlight an image URL in the top window, the bottom window tab shows a preview of the image and the following image details.

  • From – The URL chosen in the top window.
  • To – The image link found on the URL.
  • Alt Text – The alt attribute used, if any.
  • Real Dimensions (WxH) – The actual size dimensions of the image downloaded. This requires JavaScript rendering mode, and real dimensions are only shown for images that are rendered in the browser based upon the viewport.
  • Dimensions in Attributes (WxH) – The image dimensions set in the HTML according to the width and height attributes. If there are no dimensions set in the HTML, the image is flagged for potential optimisation in the ‘Missing Size Attributes’ filter in the Images tab.
  • Display Dimensions (WxH) – The image dimensions shown when rendered in Chrome (which can be based upon CSS, rather than dimension attributes in the HTML). This requires JavaScript rendering mode.
  • Potential Savings – The potential file size savings of images that have different real dimensions compared to display dimensions when rendered. If there is an estimated 4kb file size difference or more, the image is flagged for potential optimisation in the ‘Incorrectly Sized Images’ filter in the Images tab.
  • Path Type – Is the href attribute of the link absolute, protocol-relative, root-relative or path-relative links
  • Link Path – The XPath detailing the links position within the page.
  • Link Position – Where is the link located in the code (Head, Nav, Footer etc.), can be customised with the Custom Link Position configuration.
  • Link Origin – If the link was found in the HTML (only the raw HTML), the Rendered HTML (only the rendered HTML after JavaScript has been processed), HTML & Rendered HTML (both the raw and rendered HTML) or Dynamically Loaded (where there is no link, and JavaScript dynamically loads onto the page).

Duplicate Details

If you highlight a URL in the top window, this lower window tab populates. This contains details on any exact duplicates and near duplicates for the URL in question.

For near duplicates this must be enabled before the crawl and a post crawl analysis must be run.

This displays every near duplicate URL identified, and their similarity match.

Duplicate Details Tab

Clicking on a ‘Near Duplicate Address’ in the ‘Duplicate Details’ tab will also display the near duplicate content discovered between the pages and highlight the differences.

Duplicate Content Differences

Resources

Highlighting a URL in the top window will populate this bottom window tab. This tab contains a list of resources found on the URL.

  • Type – The type of resources (JavaScript, CSS, Image etc).
  • From – The current URL selected in the main window.
  • To – The resource link found on the above ‘From’ page URL.
  • Anchor Text – The anchor or link text used, if any.
  • Alt Text – The alt attribute used, if any.
  • Follow – ‘True’ means the link is followed. ‘False’ means the link contains a ‘nofollow’ , ‘UGC’ or ‘sponsored’ attribute.
  • Target – Associated target attributes (_blank, _self, _parent etc.)
  • Rel – Associated link attributes (limited to ‘nofollow’, ‘sponsored’, and ‘ugc’).
  • Status Code – The HTTP response code of the ‘To’ URL. The ‘To’ URL needs to have been crawled for data to appear.
  • Status – The HTTP header response of the ‘To’ URL. The ‘To’ URL needs to have been crawled for data to appear.
  • Path Type – Is the href attribute of the link absolute, protocol-relative, root-relative or path-relative links
  • Link Path – The XPath detailing the links position within the page.
  • Link Position – Where is the link located in the code (Head, Nav, Footer etc.), can be customised with the Custom Link Position configuration.
  • Link Origin – If the link was found in the HTML (only the raw HTML), the Rendered HTML (only the rendered HTML after JavaScript has been processed), HTML & Rendered HTML (both the raw and rendered HTML) or Dynamically Loaded (where there is no link, and JavaScript dynamically loads onto the page).

SERP snippet

If you highlight a URL in the top window, this bottom window tab populates.

The SERP Snippet tab shows you how the URL may display in the Google search results. The truncation point (where Google shows an elipsis (…) and cuts off words) is calculated based upon pixel width, rather than number of characters. The SEO Spider uses the latest pixel width cut off point and counts the number of pixels used in page titles and meta descriptions for every character to show an emulated SERP snippet for greater accuracy.

The current limits are displayed under the page titles and meta description tabs and filters ‘Over X Pixels’ and in the ‘available’ pixels column below.

SERP Snippet

Google changes the SERPs regularly and we have covered some of the changes in previous blog posts, here and here.

Google don’t provide pixel width or character length recommendations, and hence the SERP snippet emulator in the SEO Spider is based upon our research in the SERPs. Google may use more characters than are displayed in scoring, however it is important to include key information in the visible SERP for users.

The SEO Spider’s SERP snippet emulator defaults to desktop, and both mobile and tablet pixel width truncation points are different. You can update the max description preferences under ‘Config > Spider > Preferences’ to a mobile or tablet length. You can switch ‘device’ type within the SERP snippet emulator to view how these appear different to desktop and our current estimated pixel lengths for mobile.

Editing SERP Snippets

You can edit page titles and descriptions directly in the interface to view how the SERP snippet may appear in Google.

The SEO Spider will by default remember the edits you make to page titles and descriptions, unless you click the ‘reset title and description’ button. This allows you to make as many changes as you like using the emulator to perfect your SERP snippets, export (‘Reports > SERP Summary’) and send to a client or development team to make the changes to the live site.

Please note – The SEO Spider does not update your website, this will need to be performed independently.

Rendered page

You can view the rendered page the SEO Spider crawled in the ‘Rendered Page’ tab which populates when crawling in JavaScript rendering mode. This only populates the lower window pane when selecting URLs in the top window.

Rendered Page

This feature is enabled by default when using JavaScript rendering functionality, and works alongside the configured user-agent, AJAX timeout and view port size.

In the left hand lower window, ‘blocked resources’ of the rendered page can also be viewed. The filter is set to ‘blocked resources’ by default, but this can also be changed to show ‘all resources’ used by the page.

The rendered screenshots are viewable within the ‘C:\Users\User Name\.ScreamingFrogSEOSpider\screenshots-XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX’ folder, and can be exported via the ‘bulk export > Screenshots’ top level menu, to save navigating, copying and pasting.

If you’re utilising JavaScript rendering mode, then please refer to our guide on How To Crawl JavaScript Websites.

View Source

Stored HTML & Rendered HTML is displayed here when crawling with ‘Store HTML‘ or ‘Store Rendered HTML‘ enabled. This only populates the lower windowpane when selecting URLs in the top window.

To enable storing HTML simply go to ‘Configuration > Spider > Extraction > Store HTML / Store Rendered HTML’. Note, storing rendered HTML will require crawling in JavaScript rendering mode.

Original HTML is shown on the left-hand side while rendered HTML (if enabled) is displayed on the right. Both fields have a search field and are exportable.

More details can be found here.

HTTP Headers

You can view the full HTTP response and request headers of any highlighted URL providing your crawl is set to extract HTTP Headers. This only populates the lower windowpane when selecting URLs in the top window.

To enable HTTP Header extraction, click ‘Configuration > Spider > Extraction > HTTP Headers’.

The left-hand side of the tab shows the HTTP Request Headers. The right-hand side of the tab lists the HTTP Response Headers. The columns listed in this right-hand side window include:

  • Header Name – The name of the response header from the server.
  • Header Value – The value of the response header from the server.

When extracted, HTTP headers are appended in separate unique columns in the Internal tab, where they can be queried alongside crawl data.

They can also be exported in bulk via ‘Bulk Export > Web > All HTTP Headers’ or in aggregate via ‘Reports > HTTP Headers > HTTP Header Summary.

Cookies

You can view cookies found during a crawl of any highlighted URL providing your crawl is set to extract Cookies. You’re able to select single or multiple URLs in the top window which populates the lower window pane.

To enable cookie extraction, click ‘Configuration > Spider > Extraction > Cookies’. JavaScript rendering mode will need to be used to get an accurate view of cookies which are loaded on the page using JavaScript or pixel image tags.

The columns listed in the Cookies tab include:

  • Cookie Type – Where the cookie was discovered. Either over ‘HTTP’, or ‘On-Page’ – if it was via JavaScript or a pixel tag.
  • Cookie Name – The name of the cookie.
  • Cookie Value – The cookie value.
  • Domain – The domain that issued the cookie, either first or third party.
  • Expiration Time – The cookie expiry time.
  • Secure – Details of the cookie secure attribute.
  • HttpOnly – Details of the cookie HttpOnly attribute.
  • Address – The URL the cookie was found on.

Cookies can be bulk exported via ‘Bulk Export > Web > All Cookies’ and an aggregated report can be exported via ‘Reports > Cookies > Cookie Summary’.

Please note, when you choose to store cookies, the auto exclusion performed by the SEO Spider for Google Analytics tracking tags is disabled to provide an accurate view of all cookies issued.

This means it will affect your analytics reporting, unless you choose to exclude any tracking scripts from firing by using the exclude configuration (‘Config > Exclude’) or filter out the ‘Screaming Frog SEO Spider’ user-agent similar to excluding PSI.

Structured Data Details

You can view the Structured data details of any highlighted URL providing your crawl is set to extract Structured Data. This only populates the lower windowpane when selecting URLs in the top window.

To enable structured data extraction, simply go to ‘Configuration > Spider > Extraction > JSON-LD/Microdata/RDFa & Schema.org Validation/Google Validation’.

The left-hand side of the tab shows property values alongside error and/or warning icons. Clicking one of these values will provide specific details on the validation errors/warnings in the right-hand window. The columns listed in this right-hand side window include:

  • Validation Type – The structured data field with validation issues (Article, Person, Product etc).
  • Issue Severity – Whether the issue value is recommended or required to validate.
  • Issue – Details on the specific issue.

For more details please read our ‘How to Test & Validate Structured Data Guide’.

Lighthouse Details

When integrated, you can view the PageSpeed details of any highlighted URL. This will require a crawl to be connected to the PageSpeed Insights API.

To pull these metrics, simply to go ‘Configuration > API Access > PageSpeed Insights’, insert a free PageSpeed API key, connect and run a crawl.

With data available, selecting a URL in the top window will provide more details in the lower window tab.

The left-hand window provides specific information on both the metrics extracted and available opportunities specific to the highlighted URL. Clicking an opportunity will display more information in the right-hand window. This consists of the following columns:

  • The Source Page – The URL chosen in the top window.
  • URL – The linked resource which has opportunities available.
  • Size (Bytes) – The current size of the listed resource.
  • Potential Savings – The potential size savings by implementing highlighted opportunity.

Please see our PageSpeed Insights integration guide for full detail of available speed metrics and opportunities.

Spelling & Grammar Details

If you highlight a URL in the top window, this lower window tab populates. This contains details on any spelling and grammar issues for the URL in question.

The spell check and / or grammar check must be enabled before the crawl for this tab to be populated.

The lower window ‘Spelling & Grammar Details’ tab shows the error, type (spelling or grammar), detail, and provides a suggestion to correct the issue. The right hand-side of the details tab also show a visual of the text from the page and errors identified.

N-grams

The N-grams tab includes details of sequences of phrases and their frequency within HTML page content.

To enable this functionality, ‘Store HTML / Store Rendered HTML’ needs to be enabled under ‘Config > Spider > Extraction’. A URL or a selection of URLs can then be highlighted in the top window, and the n-grams tab will populate with aggregated n-gram data.

The left-hand side displays aggregated n-grams for all highlighted URLs. The filters can be adjusted to display a range of n-grams, from 1-gram to 6-gram.

N-grams lower tab

The right-hand side displays the details of the URL the selected n-grams are on. In the example above, the 2-gram ‘broken links’ is highlighted and is shown to be on 3 pages.

Overview

The overview tab updates in real-time to provide a top level view of a crawl. It provides a summary of URL data and totals of each tab and filter.

  • Summary – A summary of the URLs encountered in the crawl.
  • SEO Elements – A summary of the number of URLs found within each top-level tab and respective filter. This data can be used to uncover issues without having to click within tabs and filters. It can also be used as a shortcut to the tab and filters within the Spider’s main window.

Issues

The issues tab updates in real-time to provide details of potential issues, warnings and opportunities discovered in a crawl. This data is based upon existing data from the overview tabs and filters, but only shows potential ‘issues’.

The data is classified with issue type, priority and has in-app issue descriptions and tips.

  • Issue Name – The issue name, based upon the tab and filter.
  • Issue Type – Whether it’s likely an ‘Issue’, an ‘Opportunity’ or a ‘Warning’.
  • Issue Priority – ‘High’, ‘Medium’ or ‘Low’ based upon potential impact and may require more attention.
  • URLs – The number of URLs with the issue.
  • % of Total – Proportion of URLs with the issue from the total.
Issues Tab to identify crawl issues, warnings and opportunites

Each issue has a ‘type’ and an estimated ‘priority’ based upon the potential impact.

  • Issues are an error or issue that should ideally be fixed.
  • Opportunities are ‘potential’ areas for optimisation and improvement.
  • Warnings are not necessarily an issue, but should be checked – and potentially fixed.

Priorities are based upon potential impact that may require more attention, rather than definitive action – from broadly accepted SEO best practice. They are not hard rules for what should be prioritised in your SEO strategy or to be ‘fixed’ in your SEO audit, as no tool can provide that as they lack context.

However, they can help users spot potential issues more efficiently than manually filtering data.

E.g – ‘Directives: Noindex’ will be classed as a ‘warning’, but with a ‘High’ priority as it could potentially have a big impact if URLs are incorrectly noindex.

All Issues can be exported in bulk via ‘Bulk Export > Issues > All’. This will export each issue discovered (including their ‘inlinks’ variants for things like broken links) as a separate spreadsheet in a folder (as a CSV, Excel and Sheets).

Bulk Export All Crawl Issues

It’s important to understand that the issues tab does not substitute expertise and an SEO professional who has context of the business, SEO and nuances in prioritising what’s important.

The Issues tab acts as a guide to help provide direction to users who can make sense of the data and interpret it into appropriate prioritised actions relevant to each unique website and scenario.

A simple export of ‘Issues’ data is in itself not an ‘SEO Audit’ that we’d recommend without expert guidance and prioritisation over what’s really important.

Site Structure

The site structure tab updates in real-time to provide an aggregated directory tree view of the website. This helps visualise site architecture, and identify where issues are at a glance, such as indexability of different paths.

The top table updates in real-time to show the path, total number of URLs, Indexable and Non-Indexable URLs in each path of the website.

  • Path – The URL path of the website crawled.
  • URLs – The total number of unique children URLs found within the path.
  • Indexable – The total number of unique Indexable children URLs found within the path.
  • Non-Indexable – The total number of unique Non-Indexable children URLs found within the path.

You’re able to adjust the ‘view’ of the aggregated Site Structure, to also see ‘Indexability Status’, ‘Response Codes’ and ‘Crawl Depth’ of URLs in each path.

The lower table and graph show the number of URLs at crawl depths between 1-10+ in buckets based upon their response codes.

  • Depth (Clicks from Start URL) – Depth of the page from the homepage or start page (number of ‘clicks’ away from the start page).
  • Number of URLs – Number of URLs encountered in the crawl that have a particular Depth.
  • % of Total – Percentage of URLs in the crawl that have a particular Depth.

‘Crawl Depth’ data for every URL can be found and exported from the ‘Crawl Depth’ column in the ‘Internal’ tab.

Segments

You can segment a crawl to better identify and monitor issues and opportunities from different templates, page types, or areas of priority.

The segments configuration and right-hand tab is only available if you’re using database storage mode. If you’re not already using database storage mode, we highly recommend it.

This can be adjusted via ‘File > Settings > Storage Mode’ and has a number of benefits.

The segments tab updates in real-time to provide an aggregated view of segmented data and URLs. The tab will be blank, if segments have not been set-up. Segments can be set up by clicking the cog icon, or via ‘Config > Segments’.

The data shown for segments includes the following:

  • Segment – The segment name. The order of this follows the order selected in the segments configuration unless sorted.
  • URLs – The number of URLs within the segment.
  • % Segmented – The proportion of URLs segmented from the total number of URLs.
  • Indexable – The number of Indexable URLs in the segment.
  • Non-Indexable – The number of Non-Indexable URLs in the segment.
  • Issues – An error or issue that should ideally be fixed.
  • Warnings – Not necessarily an issue, but should be checked – and potentially fixed.
  • Opportunities – Potential areas for optimisation and improvement.
  • High – Priority based upon potential impact and may require more attention.
  • Medium – Priority based upon potential impact and may require some attention.
  • Low – Priority based upon potential impact and may require less attention.
right-hand Segments tab

The Segments tab ‘view’ filter can be adjusted to better analyse issues, indexability status, reponse codes and crawl depth by segment.

Response Times

The response times tab updates in real-time to provide a top level view of URL response times during a crawl.

  • Response Times – A range of times in seconds to download the URL.
  • Number of URLs – Number of URLs encountered in the crawl in a particular Response Time range.
  • % of Total – Percentage of URLs in the crawl in a particular Response Time range.

Response time is calculated from the time it takes to issue an HTTP request and get the full HTTP response back from the server. The figure displayed on the SEO Spider interface is in seconds. Please note that this figure may not be 100% reproducible as it depends very much on server load and client network activity at the time the request was made.

This figure does not include the time taken to download additional resources when in JavaScript rendering mode. Each resource appears separately in the user interface with its own individual response time.

For thorough PageSpeed analysis, we recommend the PageSpeed Insights API integration.

API

View the progress of data collection from all APIs along with error counts individually.

The APIs can be connected to from the ‘Cog’ icon on this tab. The APIs can also be connected to via ‘Config > API Access’ and selecting an API integration.

Please see more detail about each integration via the following links in our user guide –

Spelling & Grammar

The right-hand pane ‘Spelling & Grammar’ tab displays the top 100 unique errors discovered and the number of URLs it affects. This can be helpful for finding errors across templates, and for building your dictionary or ignore list. You can right click and choose to ‘Ignore grammar rule’, ‘Ignore All’, or ‘Add to Dictionary’ where relevant.

Top 100 Errors Spelling & Grammar

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